Lab2Pollination - POLLINATION BIOLOGY LAB BASED ON THE...

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1 POLLINATION BIOLOGY LAB BASED ON THE RESEARCH OF DR. RANDY MITCHELL LAB OUTLINE- LAB ONE TAKE A PRELAB QUIZ (OVER PAGES 2-9) MAKE OBSERVATIONS OF BEES OR FLOWER VISITATIONS FORM A HYPOTHESIS IN REGARD TO OBSERVATIONS CONSTRUCT AN EXPERIMENT OR OBSERVATION TO TEST THE HYPOTHESIS WHAT YOU HAND IN FOR LAB ONE INDIVIDUAL FIELD NOTES PROPOSAL WORKSHEET LAB TWO TEST YOUR HYPOTHESIS INTERPRET RESULTS OF EXPERIMENT OR OBSERVATIONS WHAT YOU HAND IN FOR LAB TWO EXPERIMENT SUMMARY INTERPRETATION OF FACULTY DATA POINTS LAB ONE PRELAB QUIZ – INDIVIDUAL 20 POINTS FIELD NOTES – INDIVIDUAL 10 POINTS PROPOSAL WORKSHEET – GROUP 20 POINTS LAB TWO EXPERIMENT SUMMARY – GROUP 20 POINTS FACULTY DATA INTERPRETATION – INDIVIDUAL 20 POINTS
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2 B ACKGROUND The interaction between bees and flowers is an excellent example of mutualism (a specific type of symbiosis in which the interaction between two species benefits both). Bees that visit flowers gain food (such as pollen and nectar) to feed themselves and their young, and flowers get pollinated, allowing the plant to reproduce. Aside from these benefits, both of these parties also pay costs – the bee must expend energy to hunt for and gather nectar and pollen, and the plant must provide those rewards. The economics of pollination, just like the economics of humans, dictates that pollinators will make choices among the food items available to them. The optimal foraging theory suggests that natural selection favors individuals whose foraging behavior is as energetically efficient as possible. The basic principles followed by the bees are just the same as those you use at the grocery store –foragers will spend the least (in time and energy) to get the most. These choices in turn have important consequences for the mating patterns of plants, and show that the mutualistic relationship between bees and flowers may not be as harmonious as you might guess. For example, from a pollinator’s point of view, moving from plant to plant is an extra cost to be avoided (imagine that you could only buy one item at the grocery store, then had to go to a different store for the next). Therefore, pollinators often make the shortest possible movements between flowers and between plants. However, from the plant’s point of view, this will increase the amount of inbreeding. This is generally bad for plants because most plants exhibit inbreeding depression (reduced growth and health of offspring from mating between close relatives). Thus, for the plant, the ideal pollinator would visit one flower then fly far away to visit an unrelated plant. You can see that this is not ideal for the pollinator. This tension is an important part of pollination systems. Bees or plants that minimize their costs and maximize their gains will have the best survival and
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This note was uploaded on 02/03/2012 for the course BIO 3100 taught by Professor Turner during the Fall '08 term at The University of Akron.

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Lab2Pollination - POLLINATION BIOLOGY LAB BASED ON THE...

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