The United Nations

The United Nations - Unit Six History of the United Nations...

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Unit Six Unit Six History of the United Nations History of the United Nations The name "United Nations,” coined by United States President Franklin D. Roosevelt, was first used in the "Declaration by United Nations" of 1 January 1942, during the Second World War, when representatives of 26 nations pledged their governments to continue fighting together against the Axis Powers, or, the military and political alliance of Germany, Italy, and, later Japan that fought the Allies in World War II. Forerunner: League of Nations, 1919 (p. 129) The Atlantic Charter, 1941 (p. 129-130)
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The United Nations Declaration, 1942 The United Nations Declaration, 1942 On New Year’s Day 1942, President Roosevelt, Prime Minister Churchill, Maxim Litvinov, of the USSR, and T. V. Soong of China, signed a short document which later came to be known as the United Nations Declaration and the next day the representatives of twenty-two other nations added their signatures. This important document pledged the signatory governments to the maximum war effort and bound them against making a separate peace.
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Dumbarton Oaks and Yalta Dumbarton Oaks and Yalta Representatives of China, Great Britain, the USSR, and the United States met for a business-like conference at Dumbarton Oaks, a private mansion in Washington, D. C. The discussions were completed on October 7, 1944, and a proposal for the structure of the world organization was submitted by the four powers to all the United Nations governments, and to the peoples of all countries, for their study and discussion. The United Nations was formally established on June 26, 1945 in San Francisco, California.
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Structure Structure Structure The structure of the United Nations is based around its charter. The United Nations Charter consists of 111 articles. These articles explain how the United Nations works. The charter established six parts of the United Nations: The General Assembly The Security Council Economic and Social Council Trusteeship Council (now suspended) International Court of Justice (ICJ) The Secretariat Secretary-General Voting Procedure (agreed to at the Yalta Conference, February, 1945)
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What is the UN General Assembly? What is the UN General Assembly? The UN General Assembly (UNGA) is the only universally representative body of the five principal organs of the United Nations. The other major bodies are the Security Council, the Economic and Social Council, the Secretariat, and the International Court of Justice. As delineated in the Charter of the United Nations, the function of the General Assembly is to discuss, debate, and make recommendations on a range of subjects pertaining to international peace and security-including disarmament, human rights, international law, and peaceful arbitration between disputing nations. It elects the nonpermanent members of the Security Council and
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The United Nations - Unit Six History of the United Nations...

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