Snidal (1985)- The Limits of Hegemonic Stability Theory

Snidal (1985)- The Limits of Hegemonic Stability Theory -...

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The Limits of Hegemonic Stability Theory By: Duncan Snidal (1985) Snidal, Duncan. 1985. “The Limits of Hegemonic Stability Theory.” International Organization. 39(4): 579-614. 1. Questions: a. Is HST (hegemonic stability theory) really as useful as suggested? Are the implications of its assumptions deductively reasonable? 2. Novel Approach: a. Clarifies the implicit implications and assumptions made in different strands of HST b. Introduces the concept of Relative vs. Absolute Power 3. Theoretical Foundations: 4. Theory: 5. Methods: 6. Findings: a. Stability does not necessarily need single state to produce collectively desirable outcomes b. HST is sufficient only under VERY narrow conditions 7. Questions/Critiques “Using Thomas Schelling’s notion of a “k” group, Snidal has demonstrated that it is possible for two or more states to reap sufficient net benefits for them to produce international collective goods.” From Lake (1993) Section 1: Introduction Author claims HST is far more limited than authors suggest Section 2: Derivation and Application of the Theory Section 2a: Deductive Conclusions and Empirical Implications Kindleberger is the originator of the theory Claims that a hegemonic “benevolent despot” provides the public good for all states (UK and US)
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This note was uploaded on 02/03/2012 for the course POLS 5308 taught by Professor Biglaiser during the Spring '11 term at Texas Tech.

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Snidal (1985)- The Limits of Hegemonic Stability Theory -...

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