IST 233 Exam 2 Study Guide

IST 233 Exam 2 Study Guide - IST 233 Exam 2 Study Guide...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
IST 233 Exam 2 Study Guide Chapter 5: Physical Layer Propagation Propagation and Signals Propagation: the traveling of a signal down a transmission medium Signal: a disturbance that propagates down a transmission medium to the other side,  which reads the signal Propagation effects: changes in the signal during propagation Attenuation – signal weakens Distortion – shape has been changed Interference -  If propagation effects are too large, the receiver will not be able to interpret the signal  correctly Noise – random electromagnetic energy within wires; combines with the data signal to  make the data signal difficult to read Signal-to-noise ration (SNR) – the ratio of the signal strength to average noise strength;  should be high in order for the signal to be effectively received  High ratio = signal far larger than the noise floor Noise floor – average noise level How do propagation effects differ based on the type of media used? What are the three major types of media used on today’s computer networks?  Briefly explain their advantages and disadvantages of each one. Signaling Analog – signal rises and falls smoothly in intensity
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Small propagation errors are not fixed Binary – two states per clock cycle  Small propagation effects do not create errors in reading the signal  Large propagation can render signal totally unrecognizable  Digital – more than 2 states per clock cycle Transmits multiple bits per clock cycle  Less immunity to propagation errors than binary transmission Today most signaling is binary 4-pair Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP) Inexpensive, widely available and relatively easy to install Rugged – tough and durable  Dominates media for access links between a host and the nearest switch Ethernet LANs typically use this wiring to connect to the nearest switches Not all UTP cables are created equally How many twisted pair strands are required for a traditional telephone  connection? For an Ethernet connection?  Standards and Limitations/Connectorizing  Ethernet standards limits UTP cords to 100 meters at all speeds up to 1 Gbps Signal still will be comfortably larger than noise floor so there are few noise errors UTP is easy to connectorize (add more connectors)
Background image of page 2
Crosstalk Interference Mutual interference among wire pairs in a UTP cord Always present in wire bundles The twisting of each pair normally keeps interference to a negligible level Terminal Crosstalk Interference Crosstalk interference at the ends of the UTP cord Usually much larger than the rest of the crosstalk interference over the rest of the cord Minimizing Impact of Crosstalk Interference
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/07/2012 for the course IST 195 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at Syracuse.

Page1 / 23

IST 233 Exam 2 Study Guide - IST 233 Exam 2 Study Guide...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online