IST 195 Study Guide

IST 195 Study Guide - IST 195 Study Guide The Hole in the...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
IST 195 Study Guide The Hole in the Wall  In 1999 Sugara Mitra worked for India’s largest IT training company, NIIT Limited In New Delhi, a wall separates the company’s “campus” from a nearby slum Mitra cut a hole in the wall and mounted an Internet connected PC in the hole. . . Within minutes, ghetto children, 6-12 years old, with almost no formal education or  knowledge of English taught themselves to use a mouse, drag, drop, draw, surf, play  MP3s “When Dr. Mitra asks Rajinder to define the Internet, the doe-eyed boy replies  immediately, "That with which you can do anything." The Conversation Prism Observe, Listen, Identify, internalize, Prioritize, Route Departments Support, Sales, Marketing, Community, Corporate Communication Listen/Respond Feedback, Participate, Relationships, Real-world Howard Aiken Harvard Professor Developed Mark 1 Mark 1  51 Feet Long
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
8 Feet Tall 5 Tons 500 Miles of Wire Calculates five or six times faster than a person could, but it was far slower than a  modern $5 pocket calculator. Moore’s law  Observation made in 1965 The number of transistors on an integrated circuit will double every 24 months and cost  per transistor decreases Gordon Earl Moore (born January 3, 1929) is the cofounder of Intel Corporation and the  author of Moore's law (published in an article 19 April 1965 in Electronics Magazine). Vacuum Tube   Transistors   Integrated Circuits  Vacuum tubes were used in early computers Transistors replaced vacuum tubes starting in 1956 By the mid-1960s transistors were replaced by integrated circuits Integrated circuits brought:  Increased reliability  Smaller size   Higher speed  Higher efficiency 
Background image of page 2
Types of Computers (PC, Server, Mainframes, Super Computers, Mobile)  Personal Computer – PC Two popular architects are Windows PC and Apple Servers controls access to the hardware, software, and other resources on a network Examples include: Web servers, Mail servers, File servers, etc. . Mainframes Large, expensive, powerful computer that can handle hundreds or thousands of  connected users simultaneously.   Mainframes process more than 83% of transactions around the world Supercomputers Fastest, most powerful computer Fastest supercomputers are capable of processing more than one quadrillion  instructions in a single second Mobile Mobile Computer Personal computer you can carry from place to place Examples include notebook computers, laptop computers, and Tablet PCs
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 16

IST 195 Study Guide - IST 195 Study Guide The Hole in the...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online