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Political Science Study Guide- Exam 1

Political Science Study Guide- Exam 1 - Political Science...

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Political Science Study Guide- Exam 1 Philadelphia Convention, 1787 - Delegates o All white, male, and landowners  - Only to fix Articles of Confederation - Started in a May and scheduled to take as long as it needed o May-September (1787) - First Action- Everything in secrecy  o No minutes o Genuine points of view  o No one could be held accountable for scrapping Articles of Confederation  - Areas of Consensus  o Republican form of government- National and States Hobbes o Balance of power (5 sources of power) Montesquieu o Checks and Balances Montesquieu o Needed to check despots and to quell political conflict (factions) o Constitution to protect Government from People o Qualified Voting Rights Only Ben Franklin wanted absolute voting rights  White, male, landowning  States determine who can/cannot vote o National Supremacy over state governments - Major sticking points  o Large States v Small States representation o Slavery  o Taxation of foreign commerce       Bicameralism -   Constitutional Government Theocracy Connecticut Compromise - The Great Compromise  - Roger Sherman and Oliver Ellsworth of Connecticut  - Sticking point #1: Small v Large States
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o Lower house  Popular elections (by population) Population check every 10 year and representation adjusted Power of purse o Upper house Selected by State Legislatures  Equal representation and more perks (smaller body) - Sticking point #2: Slavery o Slaves= 3/5 person o Importation of new slaves must stop by 1808 - Sticking point #3: Foreign trade  o President (whole) and states (particular interest) must compromise on all  treaties  o President negotiates treaties and senate confirms or rejects based on super  majority  - Unitary Executive  o Nationally elected (electoral college) o Qualified veto o No term limits  - Supreme Courts o President appoints and Senate confirms  o Sit for life o Size and Structure established by Congress  - Electoral College o People select electors o Electors do not have to be faithful to people  o Checks people decision for President     Separation of Powers Articles 1-7 - Legislative- Article I - Executive- Article II - Judiciary- Article III - States- Article IV, VI - People (indirect)- Article I, V, VI Checks and Balances  Street Fight
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Collective Action Problem  Theories of Power - Pluralism o Groups with shared interest influence policy by organizing and pressing  collective concerns  o Since power in US is dispersed if you loose in one arena, you take  concerns to another  o Policy is created through complex system of bargaining and compromise o Belief that democracy is preserved in a system where there is competition  among various groups  o
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