Clicker_Review_Exam_I_through_nucleic_ac

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Unformatted text preview: Here are the clicker questions I presented in the first 7 lectures with answers on the following slide. It goes through nucleic acids. A second set will be posted on carbohydrates through cytoskeleton. I use the clicker questions in class to see if I am getting the information across to you and that you understand it well enough. The questions are good for study purposes too. They are similar to questions that might be asked in exams and therefore they are useful for study along with the study guides and the practice exam. The percentage of correct answers has been very good for the class. If you have questions about the problems see me during office hours, or the review sessions or send emails. Dr.K What is the value of a membrane- bounded compartment to an animal cell? A. Can concentrate interacting molecules and thus make reactions more efficient. B. Can separate molecules and reactions from those that are interfering or non- productive to a biochemical reaction. C. Can use it to store water. D. A and B above are correct. E. A, B and C above are correct. D is correct. A compartment refers to a part of the cell that is separated physically by a barrier (a phospholipid membrane usually) from the rest of the cell in order to have a more efficient collection of molecules and macromolecules devoted to a particular process. Eukaryotic cells have many compartments (nucleus, lysosome, mitochondria, Golgi, ER, peroxisomes, vesicles and some other specialized ones). The nucleus for instance stores, protects, replicates, transcribes DNA more efficiently by having the enzymes and substrates for those processes at a higher concentration in the nucleus. Having a compartment also generally prevents unwanted interactions; an example would be the catabolic enzymes in the lysosome should not be released in the cytoplasm where they would degrade the rest of the cell. All cellular life depends on the special properties of water and so it is absolutely necessary in metabolizing cells but it is not stored as such in a compartment. Your new year’s resolution is to get fit. You start on a diet and lose fat (= hydrocarbons). Where did the fat go? A. It was used up as energy. B. It was released as carbon dioxide. C. It was converted to energy in ATP. D. It was “burned up” in cellular respiration. B. We want you to think about separating what is mass from what is energy so that you can follow the two in reactions and biochemical pathways without conflating them. The carbon mass of the fat will be released as carbon dioxide; later when we look at it in more detail we will see that water is also released. A, C and D are all versions of a colloquial and non-scientific way to think that mass becomes matter or the mass and energy are inter-convertible. The energy of the bonds in fat are used in respiration to make the energetic bonds of molecules like ATP but carbon element mass does not make energy nor is it “burned up” as energy. The concentration of sodium chloride...
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This note was uploaded on 02/03/2012 for the course BS 111 taught by Professor Patterson during the Spring '05 term at Michigan State University.

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Clicker_Review_Exam_I_through_nucleic_ac - Here are the...

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