Week_08_Lecture_-_Risk_in_Engineering

Week_08_Lecture_-_Risk_in_Engineering - New Orleans Levees...

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ew Orleans Levees New Orleans Levees and he Role of Risk in Engineering Design The Role of Risk in Engineering Design homas F Wolff Ph D P E Thomas F. Wolff, Ph.D., P.E. Associate Dean, Michigan State University Member, ASCE Levee Assessment Team, 2005 ember IPET Internal Technical Review Team 2006 Member, IPET Internal Technical Review Team, 2006 Consultant, US Department of Justice, 2008-09 September 2010
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he End Overview The End – The Aftermath of Katrina he Beginning The Beginning – Evolution of New Orleans Hurricane Protection What Happened and How – The Failures and the Technical story Why Could this Happen? – Managing Risks in Engineering Design
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(Slide Show)
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he Mississippi River Valley The Mississippi River Valley
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17 th Street Canal – Before and After
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727 History 1727 Four foot levee, one mile long 735 878 epeated 1735 – 1878 – Repeated cycles of flooding and levee building 1879 – Mississippi River Commission 1900 – 1920 Pumping plants, reclaimed land 1927 – Great Mississippi River Flood 956 1954 urricanes 1956, 1954 Hurricanes 1964 Hurricane Protection Authorized 1965, 69 – Betsy and Camille
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hat is a 100 year Flood? What is a 100 year Flood? (multiple choice) • A. Occurs every 100 years . Has a one percent chance of happening in B. Has a one percent chance of happening in any given year • C. The magnitude of flooding that has a one percent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any given year A flood that will occur 100 years from now • D. A flood that will occur 100 years from now
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Hurricane Protection •De s igne d fo r Standard Project Hurricane – Defined by Weather Bureau based on atmospheric pressure and track assumptions; revised along the way, but not always the case for the design – Worst hurricane that could be “reasonably expected” – Categories came later, and are based only on wind speeds. Categories are about wind damage. – Considered to be consistent with “fast moving category 3.” Recurrence – Corps stated equivalent to 200-300 year protection thers said
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Hurricane Protection What was the SPH approach to risk? – 1 in 100 annual chance of given low pressure occurring in a 300 mile stretch of coast storm hard to imagine hich could occur – A storm hard to imagine, which could occur – Not equivalent to 100 yr storm at the site , or even the largest storm of record
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This note was uploaded on 02/03/2012 for the course EGR 100 taught by Professor Hinds during the Fall '08 term at Michigan State University.

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Week_08_Lecture_-_Risk_in_Engineering - New Orleans Levees...

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