lecture09 - 9/15/11 Physics for Scientists &...

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Unformatted text preview: 9/15/11 Physics for Scientists & Engineers 2, Chapter 23 1 September 15, 2011 Physics for Scientists&Engineers 2 2 Given is a uniform electric eld E. Find the potential difference V f-V i by moving a test charge q along the path icf. Idea: Integrate along the path connecting ic and cf. Imagine, we move a test charge q from i to c and from c to f. i f c September 15, 2011 Physics for Scientists&Engineers 2 3 Given is a uniform electric eld E. Find the potential difference V f-V i by moving a test charge q along the path icf. Along ic, ds and E are perpendicular i f c With the distance from c to f: d/sin(45 o ) September 15, 2011 Physics for Scientists&Engineers 2 4 We just derived V f-V i for the situation b). What is V f-V i when going directly from i to f without stopping by c? A: 0 B: -Ed C: +Ed D: -1/2 Ed i f c i f a) b) 9/15/11 Physics for Scientists & Engineers 2, Chapter 23 6 We calculate the electric potential from a system of n point charges by adding the potential functions from each charge is summation produces an electric potential at all points in space a scalar function Calculating the electric potential from a group of point charges is usually much simpler than calculating the electric eld Its a scalar V = V i i = 1 n = kq i r i i = 1 n 9/15/11 Physics for Scientists & Engineers 2, Chapter 23 7 Assume we have a system of three point charges: q 1 = +1.50 C q 2 = +2.50 C q 3 = -3.50 C q 1 is located at (0, a ) q 2 is located at (0,0) q 3 is located at ( b ,0) a = 8.00 m and b = 6.00 m. What is the electric potential at point P located at ( b , a )? 9/15/11 Physics for Scientists & Engineers 2, Chapter 23 8 e electric potential at point P is given by the sum of the electric potential from the three charges V = kq i r i i = 1 3 = k q 1 r 1 + q 2 r 2 + q 3 r 3 = k q 1 b + q 2 a 2 + b 2 + q 3 a V = 8.99 10 9 N m 2 C 2...
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This note was uploaded on 02/03/2012 for the course MTH 235 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at Michigan State University.

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lecture09 - 9/15/11 Physics for Scientists &...

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