As1(1) - Physics 253b Assignment#1 updated I like a lot of feedback on my courses and that goes for the problem sets So if you see something that

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Unformatted text preview: Physics 253b Assignment #1 updated January 28, 2010 I like a lot of feedback on my courses, and that goes for the problem sets. So if you see something that doesn’t make sense here, or the reading makes no sense, or you have any other issues, drop me an email right away. Read pages 33-42 of “INTRODUCTION TO THE BACKGROUND FIELD METHOD” Vol. 813 (1982) ACTA PHYSICA POLONICA No 1-2, By L. F. Abbott. This paper seems to be freely available on the web, so I put it up on the course web page. We will return to the rest of the paper later when we talk about nonAbelian gauge theories. Some of this material is also treated in sections 11.4 and 11.5 of Peskin and Schroeder (P&S from now on) though I find Abbott easier to read, which is why I have assigned it rather than P&S. P&S are interested in this because it helps with a systematic treatment of renormalization. Some of this is also mentioned in section IV-3 of Zee, where the issue is symmetry breaking. I suggest that you don’t read Zee’s treatment yet. We will return to this later. When we come back to it later on, we will also go back to the originalwill return to this later....
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This note was uploaded on 02/04/2012 for the course PHY 253B taught by Professor Georgi during the Spring '10 term at Princeton.

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As1(1) - Physics 253b Assignment#1 updated I like a lot of feedback on my courses and that goes for the problem sets So if you see something that

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