Phylogeny Fall 2011 - Phylogeny and the Tree of Life Fig....

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–18. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Phylogeny and the Tree of Life Fig. 26-21 Fungi EUKARYA Trypanosomes Green algae Land plants Red algae Forams Ciliates Dinoflagellates Diatoms Animals Amoebas Cellular slime molds Leishmania Euglena Green nonsulfur bacteria Thermophiles Halophiles Methanobacterium Sulfolobus ARCHAEA COMMON ANCESTOR OF ALL LIFE BACTERIA (Plastids, including chloroplasts) Green sulfur bacteria (Mitochondrion) Cyanobacteria Chlamydia Spirochetes Phylogenetic Tree of Life Fig. 26-1 What is this? Fig. 26-1 Common scaly-foot (a burrowing legless lizard not a snake) Pygopus lepidopodus Fig. 26-2 Fungi and animals are more closely related to each other than either is to plants! Common names - advantages Are often descriptive , e.g. goats beard Allow us to communicate with the general public Common names - disadvantages Not useful to speakers of another language , e.g. crape myrtle is sarusuberi (monkey slip tree) in Japanese Wide-ranging plants often have several different common names , e.g. the common garden pansy has over 200 common names Two or more plants can share the same common name , e.g. many trees are called ironwood No way to regulate the formation of common names or to legislate which are to be accepted http://faculty.etsu.edu/mcdowelt/Photos%20Use%5CCarpinus%20caroliniana%20fl.jpg Inconspicuous or rare species may have no common name Sometimes a common name is used for a single species, but sometimes for a larger group such as a genus or even a family, e.g. sedge Christmas cherry or winter cherry is a poisonous nightshade Common names may be misleading or show a false relationship Silverfish is a wingless insect Eastern red cedar is a species of Juniperus (the junipers) Desert willow is in the trumpet creeper family, not in the willow family Fig. 26-3 Species: Panthera pardus Genus: Panthera Family: Felidae Order: Carnivora Class: Mammalia Phylum: Chordata Kingdom: Animalia Archaea Domain: Eukarya Bacteria Standardized ending -idae Binomial nomenclature Traditional Hierarchical Classification For Animal Kingdom Traditional Hierarchy of Classification for the Plant Kingdom Using onion as an example: Species name Allium cepa L. (Genus + specific epithet, underlined separately or italicized; L. stands for the author of the name, in this case Linnaeus) Genus Allium Family Lili aceae Order Lili ales Class Lili opsida Phylum (or Division) Magnoli ophyta Kingdom Plantae Domain- Eukarya Note standardized endings are in red! Plurals for Ranks Phyla is plural for Phylum Genera is plural for Genus Species is both singular and plural Taxon Any named group at any rank Plural is taxa Taxa at same rank in different lineages may differ in size, diversity, and characters used to define them Example: The Magnoliophyta is a very diverse phylum with over 250,000 species of flowering plants, and the Ginkgophyta is a phylum represented by a single species, the maidenhair tree, a gymnosperm Fig. 26-4Fig....
View Full Document

Page1 / 69

Phylogeny Fall 2011 - Phylogeny and the Tree of Life Fig....

This preview shows document pages 1 - 18. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online