Lecture 5a, China’s Classical Tradition (1)

Lecture 5a, China’s Classical Tradition (1)...

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Unformatted text preview: China’s Classical Tradition A Minimalist Approach Confucius, Kongzi 551-479 B.C.E. Nei sheng wai wang Inner sagehood, outer kingship XIAO, REN, & LI are both ideas & modes of behavior/practices. As modes of behavior, they tell you what a person is like, both within & without. Within these modes of behavior are expectations of how one should behave, what one’s personality is like. Xiao, filial devotion • Ren is a complex blend of duty, affection, reciprocity, & longing. • REN is both a concept and a practice. • XIAO & REN, both expressions of relatedness – to family and community. • Li, ritual devotion, etiquette • Confucius changed the meaning of LI from its original meaning - propitiating the dead – to reverence, respect, courtesy, discipline & “good form.” • Together, XIAO, REN, & LI are ways to cultivate particular moral attitudes in individuals . • Self-cultivation ( yangxin ) results in a junzi . jun zi xin Self-cultivation; nurture the mind. “Gentleman” Mozi 480-390 B.C.E. Mohists & Confucian Compared • • Xian, noble or worthy man seeks first the general good . Responsible for constructing the ideal society. Mozi’s Xian’s emphasis was on “doing good;” Confucius, on “being good.” Mohists, “outer-oriented” Confucians, “inner oriented” – inner transformation was crucial to achieving social goals. • Mozi’s outward orientation required “universal love” or “universal fairness” or “sense of equity.” “Abiding moral disposition.” Ai must be starting point of creating a peaceful, stable society. •...
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Lecture 5a, China’s Classical Tradition (1)...

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