Lecture 15, Jomon, Yayoi, Kofun Japan

Lecture 15, Jomon, Yayoi, Kofun Japan - Jomon, Yayoi, Kofun...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–27. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Jomon, Yayoi, Kofun Periods
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Mythical Origins Japanese descended from the gods – Amaterasu
Background image of page 2
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Print by Yoshitora, 1861. Influence of Japanese nationalism as myth of Amaterasu elevated in importance. Japanese saw themselves as descendents of the gods.
Background image of page 4
Japanese nationalists claim all Japanese descendants of Amaterasu. Note the parallel development in Choson Korea – with the elevation of T’angun.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Prehistory Islands linked to mainland by land bridge, 120,000-12,000 BP
Background image of page 6
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Jomon, 10,000-400 BCE 12,000 BP/10,000 BCE, worldwide warming trend; peaked ca. 5000 BP/3000 BCE Sea levels rose; Japan cut-off from mainland Jomon – “cord-marked” pottery gives name to era
Background image of page 8
Map of major Middle Jomon Sites c.3500-2500 BCE
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Cord-marked Pottery from the Interaction spheres, left photo found in Korea, right photo, found in Japan
Background image of page 10
Jomon or Paleolithic Japan, 11,000-300 BCE Vase from Middle Jomon, 3 rd -2 nd millennium
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Heart-shaped face of Jomon people, 5000 BP
Background image of page 12
Jomon female figure of 4 th century BCE
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Middle-Late Jomon Dogu Used for ritual purposes; broken to drive away pain of childbirth or sickness Most are female Some with distinctive snow-goggle faces
Background image of page 14
Art historians want to know if our Paleolithic ancestors exaggerated, to a grotesque extent, certain features? Theory: in the harsh climates of Paleolithic ice ages, fatness and fertility would have been highly desirable. Jomon people were not the only ones sculpting grotesque figures. Witness the Venus of Willendorf, c. 22,000 BCE.
Background image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 16
Dogu w/ beastlike & human features; ritual purpose to ward off evil? Note catlike eyes & grotesque hair lip; 3 finger “hand” a ritual gesture?
Background image of page 17

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 18
Jomon people Hunter-gatherers Experts debate whether Jomon people remained hunter-gatherers or became agriculturalists. Consensus, remained hunter-gatherers Were Jomon people ancestors of modern Japanese? Yes & no. Certainly linked to modern-day Ainu.
Background image of page 19

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Yayoi Period 400 BCE-250 CE
Background image of page 20
Yayoi migrants Came from NE Asia Linked to intro of wet rice agriculture; use of metal. Arrived via Korean & China routes – see maps of interaction spheres & spread of rice agriculture.
Background image of page 21

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Spread of Rice Culture
Background image of page 22
Interaction Spheres
Background image of page 23

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Region 1 P’yongyang/Lelang, Core area Region 3, Han & Yangsan Rivers; around Seoul Region 4, Naktong River, includes Kyongju, Silla & Kyushu.
Background image of page 24
Sixth century CE model of boats for crossing between Korea and Japan
Background image of page 25

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Yayoi migrated across the Tsushima Strait; entered Kyushu around Hakata Bay; began migration north and east along Inland Sea. Largest settlements in the Kinai region. Hakata Bay
Background image of page 26
Image of page 27
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/03/2012 for the course HIST 284 taught by Professor C.r.lilley during the Fall '11 term at Maryland.

Page1 / 93

Lecture 15, Jomon, Yayoi, Kofun Japan - Jomon, Yayoi, Kofun...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 27. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online