Lecture 17, Song Era

Lecture 17, Song Era - Tang-Song Transition Tang China,...

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Tang-Song Transition
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Tang China, 742-822 After An Lushan rebellion, 755, Tang split into ca. 40 domains. Brief period of recovery ca. 820 Huang Chao Rebellion, 874-884, Tang collapsed
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60 year transition period Return to unity not certain Potential for creation of 8 to 10 independent Chinese states Realms shared same underlying cultural values. But each sought to establish and maintain an independent state.
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Campaigns of Song Taizu & Taizong, 963-979
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Brothers reunite China by bringing states around Central Plain (N. China) under control through a series of military campaigns. Map suggests following Strategy of isolating and attacking enemies one by one. Other part of strategy was to capturing enemy’s capital. Control of northern frontier tenuous from beginning.
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Short-lived control of N. China Treaty of Shanyuan, 1005, gave control of 16 prefectures in north to Liao (Khitan) Empire Treaty of 1146, gave control almost entire north down to Huai River to new nomadic empire, Jin, founded by Jurchens. Extensive trade relations maintained throughout 11 th through 13 th centuries.
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Song Era: New Culture, New Economy, New Consumer Society Increased sources of wealth in society. Result of development of agriculture, industry, and commerce. From this material base, Song China became the wealthiest, most orderly, most culturally and technologically advanced portion of the world. Extraordinary population growth. Urbanization, commercialization, industrialization New consuming habits of elite
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Han Empire Population Distribution, ca. 2 C.E.
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Tang Population Distribution ca. 742
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Song Population Distribution, ca. 1100 C.E.
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Han Empire Population Distribution, ca. 2 C.E.
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Tang Empire Population Distribution, ca. 742
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Song Dynasty Population Distribution, ca. 1100
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Song most Urban of world civilizations City Wall of Beijing, 1906
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Urban Life Zhang Deduan Scroll
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Song Rainbow Bridge
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Close up of Zhang Deduan Silk Scroll of City Life, Rainbow Bridge
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Water Transport, Water-Powered Mills, & Production of Grain
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Early 13 th century – most famous depiction of water mill.
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Right side, man carrying his grain crosses the river on a ferry, rests at the winnowing scene w/ the two suspended sieves, grinds his grain on the millstones, and sifts it in a rather large-framed open mill.
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Millstones and sieves are driven by horizontal water wheels placed far below the work- room just above water level. The flour is sun-dried on the terrace, put in sacks, and again ferried across the river, before it is loaded onto freight carts that disappear to the left.
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Forty workers at work in this depiction. Note, too, there are two officials in upper left corner along w/ three attendants. Their presence clearly indicates that the govt
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Lecture 17, Song Era - Tang-Song Transition Tang China,...

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