Lecture 21, The Mongol Conquests & China

Lecture 21, The Mongol Conquests & China - The...

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The Mongols
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Ruth W. Dunnell, Chinggis Khan: World Conqueror.
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Structure of Book Author’s Preface Survey of Eurasian nomadic society, state, culture before the Mongols Biography of Chinggis Khan Legacies
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Author’s Preface, XI “Undertaking a new biography of a world figure about whom so many have written so much is a daunting task. Yet many of us who teach the Mongol Empire, either in passing or in depth, to undergraduate students have felt the absence of a concise, historically sensitive, un- sensationalizing, and affordable biography, one that tells a gripping tale yet also helps students think through the larger implications of an individual life and community have come down to us.
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Author’s Preface, XI “In the case of someone like Chinggis Khan, there are many ways that such a book could be written; this is only one. It reflects my life-long interest in the history of cultural and other kinds of interactions between the Chinese world and the world of peoples who lived in the vast expanses between China and Europe.
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Author’s Preface, IX “It also reflects my belief that the history of those peoples, Eurasian steppe nomads and Mongols among them, operated according to principles that we are only beginning to understand, and that the more we try to uncover their dynamics, the better we understand our own histories.” xi
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Chapter 10, Legacies, 93-94 “Careful scolarship over the last fifty years shows that the Mongols bequeathed a rich and many-faceted legacy comparable to the subsequent impact of expanding Europe on the Old World (or what used to be called the third world). Throughout the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries, the Mongols’ relationship to the sedentary civilizations with which they interacted changed continuously, as befitted a highly adaptable people.
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Chapter 10, Legacies, 94 “In its conquests, governing policies, and disintegration, the Mongol Empire transformed the identities of many peoples (including the Mongols themselves), destroyed some outright, and created new ethnic groups and polities in their wake.”
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Chapter 10, Legacies, 94 “Above all, the Mongols created new cultural syntheses wherever they ruled, combining their own steppe practices and military-political structures with the economic, administrative, and cultural elements of the people whom they recruited and among whom they lived, be they Muslim Turks nomads, Persian clerics, or Chinese bureaucrats.
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Chapter 10, Legacies,94 “A distinctive Mongol imperial culture emerged and was widely shared across the empire even after its breakup into rival khanates. . .Core Mongol beliefs, policies, and imperial practices defined a ‘Chinggisid dispensation,’ which framed the political landscape of large parts of Eurasia for centuries afterward.”
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What Set the Mongols in Motion? Why Did the Mongols Wreak So Much
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This note was uploaded on 02/03/2012 for the course HIST 284 taught by Professor C.r.lilley during the Fall '11 term at Maryland.

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Lecture 21, The Mongol Conquests & China - The...

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