Moravcsik-Vachudova_NationalInterestsStatePowerAndEUEnlargement

Moravcsik-Vachudova_NationalInterestsStatePowerAndEUEnlargement

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Unformatted text preview: 10.1 7 /08 325402 39682 ARTICLE National Interests, State Power, and EU Enlargement East European Politics and Societies National Interests, State Power, and EU Enlargement Andrew Moravcsik and Milada Anna Vachudova* Some fifteen years after the collapse of communism, the uniting of Western and Eastern Europe through a substantial enlarge- ment of the EU is perhaps the most important single policy instru- ment available to further a more stable and prosperous conti- nent. Eight postcommunist states have concluded negotiations with the EU for full membership in 2002, and several more are poised to do so later. In this article, we seek to outline in the very broadest strokes the most important structural forces of national interest and influence underlying the dynamics of enlargement itself and its future consequences for EU governance. We do not claim our analysis is comprehensive, only that it seeks to capture the most significant of the underlying forces in play. The apparent success of enlargement and the terms on which it is taking place have surprised many analysts and aroused many critics. Most commentators treat enlargement as a radical break in the history of the EU. They find the prospect of enlargement itself mystifying and invoke idealistic motivations on the part of Euro- pean governments to explain it. At the same time, many criticize the EU for taking too long to enlarge and for imposing burden- some conditions on the candidates. Still others fear that enlarge- 42 East European Politics and Societies, Vol. 17, No. 1, pages 42–57. ISSN 0888-3254 © 2003 by the American Council of Learned Societies. All rights reserved. DOI: 10.1177/0888325402239682 * We would like to thank Thomas Oatley for his comments and to acknowledge the research assistance of Marius Hentea and Patrick Toomey. We have deleted many footnotes, includ- ing references to work by ourselves and others providing empirical support for the claims made below. The article draws in particular on Milada Anna Vachudova, “The Leverage of International Institutions on Democratizing States: The European Union and Eastern Europe” (Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies [RSCAS] Working Paper No. 2001/33) (Fiesole, Italy: European University Institute, 2001); and Andrew Moravcsik, “Europe’s Inte- gration at Century’s End,” in Andrew Moravcsik, ed., Centralization or Fragmentation? Europe Facing the Challenges of Deepening, Diversity, and Democracy (New York: Council on Foreign Relations Press, 1998). A fully footnoted version is available online at http:// www.people.fas.harvard.edu/~moravcs/. ment without substantial federalizing reform will mean gridlock and crisis for the EU’s institutions....
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This note was uploaded on 02/05/2012 for the course 790 395 taught by Professor Tillery during the Fall '09 term at Rutgers.

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Moravcsik-Vachudova_NationalInterestsStatePowerAndEUEnlargement

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