Chapter 1 – Statistics as Science

Chapter 1 – Statistics as Science - Chapter...

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Chapter 1 – Statistics as Science Note if mentioned during lecture: How to… - Choose data - Relate data to theoretical concepts - Asses accuracy and relevance of data - Issues of how to collect data 1.1 - The study of statistics is unique. It provides the methodology for decision making; it provides the methodology for the evaluation and advancement of science. The interaction between all the sciences and the study of statistics arises from the inherent presence of randomness, inevitable errors in observation and measurement, and lack of complete control of any experiment. 1.2 - What criteria do we use, what facts do we need, and how do we asses those facts? 1.3 – The decisions and evaluations all involve collecting and assessing data and determining their relevance to our problem. Empirically discovered patterns of association— correlation is the technical term—are not to be confused with casualty. Casualty is the concept that there is a logical link between two events that indicates that variation in one leads to changes in the values taken by the other. 1.4 – Modeling is the process of creating a hypothesis that purports to explain the data. Explanation
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This note was uploaded on 02/03/2012 for the course ECON 20 taught by Professor Jamesramsey during the Spring '12 term at NYU.

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Chapter 1 – Statistics as Science - Chapter...

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