Quixote+Part+II+-+Chapter+9+x+3

Quixote+Part+II+-+Chapter+9+x+3 - w. w. NORTON &...

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Unformatted text preview: w. w. NORTON & COMPANY also publishes TI-IENORTON ANTHOLOGY OF AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE edmdbyHemyLouflGaeer. andNeIlie Y. McKayet. al THE NORTON ANTHOLOGY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE edited by Nina Bay»: at al. THE NORTON ANTHOIQGY ORCONWORARY FICTION edited by R. V. Cassi]! ' THE NORTON ANTI-IOLOGY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE _ emfbyuliflbrmagl. - _ .- THE NORTON OE BY WOMEN edited by swan Gilbert and Susan Gab» TI-IB NORTON ANTHOLOGY OF MODERN POETRY editedblechardElbnorm andRome'Clair THE NORTON ANTHOLOGY OF POETRY edlwd by Margaret Ferguson et al. THE NORTON ANTHOLOGY OF SHORT FICTION W by R. V. Cass!!! THE NORTON ANTHOLOGY OF WORLD MASTERPIECES edited by Maynard Mack et al. THE NORTON FACSIMILB OF THE FIRST FOLIO OF SHAKESPEARE prepared by Charlton Hiranan THE NORTON INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE editedbyCarlE. Rain. Jeromeme andJ. Paxde THE NORTON INTRODUCTION TO THE SHORT NOVEL edited by Jerome Booty THE NORTON READER etfitedbyLindaH. Peterson, John C. Brenton. andJoanE. Hartman THE NORTON SAMPIBR edited by Thomas Cooley -I«-I~. . . -u.—...- w. -D A NORTON CRITICAL EDITION MIGUEL DE THE'ORMSBY TRANSLATION, REVISED I BACKGROUNDS AND SOURCES ' ' CRITICISM? W Editodby _ JOSEPH R. JONES- Worm-m- AND KENNETH DOUGLAS “T3 0“ flit-131mm: Ix * £3; * “A 16m , w. . ' ' New 3:": NORTON a; COMPANY t ....L.........._._....._._- .'..;._ 64 ' Don Quixote mletoutforhheandhehadnochoicebuttodmwhissword. Luckily however, he3was near the coach, from which he marble toisnatch a-cushion thatservedhhnasashield.Andthey waitatoneanotherasziftheyhadheenmormlenemies.Theothers ‘uiedtomakepemehetwemthmbutcculdnotforthemscayan declaredmhisedisiointed-phmses thatifflreydidnotlethimfinish 'hishatflehe'wbuldkfll'hismistressandeveryonethattriedtopre. venthim. Thelady-in'flrereoach,amazodandterrifiedat what she .saw, ordered the coachman‘torpull away a'little, and set herself to watchthissevere intheeourseofittheBiscayansmote Don-Quixoteamightystrokeonflreshoulderoverthetopofhis ' which,had-henotbeen:wearingarmor,wouldhaveclefthim tothe‘waist- ' - Feeling the weight of this ptodigiom-blow, Don Qurxnte' cried _aloud. “O lady of my souL'Dulcinea, flower of beauty," he said, “cometotheaidofthis thykhight,who,infnlfllingln'sobliga- firms to thy beam-finds himself-in this Name-peril." Tosayflziwtoliithisswordtoshelterhimselfwellbehhrdhis shield,andtoassail-theBiseayanmstheworkofaninstant,forhe wasdeteanmedtovenmrealluponasingleblow.TheBiscayan, seemg.hoWheattaclned“wasconvinwdofhisicomage:byhis9pirited hearing, and'raolved to follow hismmplc. Sohe waited for Don Quixotekeepingwell Undercoverofhiscushion.3uthecouldnot ‘mecnte any sort'of. maneuver with his mule which, dead tired-and nevermeantforthisldndofgamgeorfldnotstiraste'p. . 0a, then,as-wehave-said,came-Donguixoteagainstthewary Biscayan,withuptiftedsword.firm1yrssotved tosth himin haH. OnhissidetheBisoayanwaitedforhimswordinhandandpro- moted'by his cushion}. stood tumbling, anxiolnly waiting - the result offile-hlows'that th'réatene‘rtto fall,- while theladyin the coachand-therestofher'followingweremak’mgathonsandvows andofiefingstoalltheimages-and-shrmesofs ’ thatGo’dmight deliver her-squire andcll'of them from the greatperil in which-they But at this point of crisis, the author of the history leaves-the battleinsfispensespoflingthewholeepisoddTheexcusehcofiers is that he could find nothing more-written about these achieve what-husheadybeentolth-istrue thesecondauthorofthisworkiiwasunwmingtobeliwethatsc interesfingahistorycouldhavebeenallowedtolapse'into oblivion, or" thatzlearned persons in La Mancha could have been so-undis- cemingasnot-to'preserve in'theizarchivesorsegistriessomedocw mentsreferfingtothisfamousknightsmcesuchwashisconviction, he‘did’hotd " ' of' ' theoouclusion ofthis-pteasanthis- ' hmhvodngM-mawaytobe-rdatcdmflre amqu-WMdmmdm. ' ammo ___ L. .mleuqhflammrwyaum... I _ azawt'itm waiver-Va «95'»- - ' .- I mawwmwmmrm '.'3T‘?‘-FW-'+E.'fi" 4W},.gm!1':-i52:1taxmétésmfitawas {writ-flfli’trt {fifemifitR-‘mfifi.iéltt'h l Second: of I “ __ThelngleniovusfiGentleman -- -QtiiXote of La Mancha cage; is mmmi'qwcpmmmmm_ ._ name mmmsmcummmvwr- ., GAN- . IntheFxrst'Partof'flrishistoryweleft'thevaliantB _ and theW'DOPQuixotewithdmwnswprflsuplifteimdyto delivertwo such thatifth hadlanded sqnudy,fl1eywouldat.the . the combat antsasunderfromtoptotoeandlaid'themopenlflreapomegmm ate..A_t this suspensefifl‘ . _ pointthedehgh' tfnlhrstory' cametoa'stop and remained curtailed with no indication from the author where fhcmissingpartcouldbefound. . _ ’ This me greatly. because the pleasure from. mdingthissr'nallportionturnedtovexationatthethoughtofhow slightachancelhad'ofeverfinding thelargerportionriequireior soitseemedtomtocomplritesuchaninteresting .Itstruck me as impossible and against all precedent that no scho 1y person shorfldhavenndertakentoreccr'dthesemarvelous ' ts. Such a lack never afiicted those‘knightsverrant' who, ‘as do‘say, set out adventures seeking.’ Each one of them had ne or two scriha seemingly created for the purpose. They not _ y recorded knightly deeds but wrote down the knights’ most ' ‘ thoughts and whimsies, however they might be. No, such a gnod knight could 'not have incurred the have‘met with what _Platir _a'ndpthers like him had ‘in ab ‘ And so I could not myself to believe. that such a gallant had been left maimed and mutilated. I laid the blameon Time, d__ destroyerofallthings,whichhadeitherconeealedbrco I _ 'On the otherhand, it struck me that, since aniong his books therehadbeenfOundsuchmodernonesasmlEnligh' of Icalousy and the Nymphs and Shepherds of Handles, stdry must likewisebemodern.Thus,thoughitmightnotbewri itmight Lm'dividod m'vomnow uafiomhedidnotmalso yuan. called'Doum.PmI.mofont . m-bmwhnhmbfishedhisocnfln- . 65 64 ‘ Dothnixata tmesletoutforhheandhehdnochoicebuttodmwhissword. Luckflyhrhifihowever,hewusneartheooach,fromwhichhe mahietoshatchaeushionthatservedhimasashield.Andthey wentqtonennotherasiftheyhadheenmortalenefiesfl'heothers ‘triedtomnloeganebetwbenthmbutcouldnohforthefiiscayan declaredinhisdisioinhedphmsesihatifflmydidnot.lethimfinish hithatflehewouldkfllhismimessmdeveryonethat—triedtopre Venthim..Theladyrinfl1ecoach,amazedandterrifiedatwhatshe samurderedthemachmanm-prfll-amyalitfleandsethesselfto watchthissarerestruglehflieeourseofittheliiscaynnmote Don-Quixoteamightystrokedutheshoolderoverflie-top'ofhis shield;which,hadhenotbeenwearingarmor,wouldhnveclefthhn tothe‘woist.‘ ' ' - z Feeling the weight of this prodigious blow, Don: Quixote cried aloud.“01£dyofmysonl,‘Dulcinea,‘flowerofheauty,"-hesaid, “cometothe‘aid ofthisthy knight, who, in-fulfllinghisohliga- tions to flry‘beauty, finds himselfiin this-extreme peril." ' To'my-thigmfifthhmritoshelter'himselfwellbehind-his shield,andtoassail-theBiseayanwastheworko£aninsmnt,forhe wasdeterminedtovenlmeallupona-singleblow.TheBisoayan, seeing-howhe aflackeéwasconfincedofhisooumgehy-his b ‘ and "resolved to folltm'his he waited for Don '1 keepihgwellundercoverofhiscush‘ion.3utheicouldnot execute-shy sort of monomer-with his mule which, dead tired-end nemmmnthrthhldndofgamqmoldndtsfiraste'p. . .. -' .'On,then;aswehavesaidgcame’DonQIfixoreagainstthe-mry . Biscayan, with uplifted'sword, firmly resolved to split him in half. sword inhand-mdpro- tectedibyhis cushion. Allipresent stood trembling. anxiously waiting 'flie result of the-blows'flmt threatened-to fall, while-melody in the «shorthand therestofherfofiowingweremakinga'thomandvows andofieringstoalltheimagesandthrinesofSpoin; thatGodmigst deliver her- squire and all-of them from theperil in-whichxflrey But at'this-point of crisis, the author of the'history. leaves the 'hattleihsospense, spoilingthe wholeepisode.“‘1heafeusehe oEers is that-he could find’nothing more written about these aohieve ments'ot Don Quixotethan what'hasalresdy been mm. It is true thesecondauthorofthiswork‘wakunwiflingtohelievethatso interesfingahistoryoolfldhaveheenallowedtolapseintoohlivion, or that-{learned persons'in' La Mandmo'ould haveheen'so undis- oerningn's not to preserve iii'theif érchiveso'megishiessome dam mentsreferringtothisfamousknightSinoesuchwashisconviction, he‘did'not ' of’d' the-conclusion of this pleasant his- tory. Hedid ' heavenfavorhrghimfindmytoherelatadhrflre 2kamWMdMWMW. ., “5:12! .5} "‘3Hflm’gflfifi{Emmi-s9 ' ;'.. .3- 1.7;. Wat-2‘; 1-1:. ._, _ -: "(_'_|. -' . ‘T:I'r§'-9§3_'-'5'U! 1.1955315 " .trimmfiwmmmmmm.rggpmm?a _., 3, __ The" Saw? Pm'of The Ingenious I Dan,“ Qfixote of La " Chem m‘ . mm amm_munumnrscumwnmvm mom Inthe Fi'rst‘Part of'thisthe'valiant Bison . . ' and the renowned Don swords to deliver two suchqu slgshing hlor'ws that___if.they _ landed squarely,theymuldattheleasthavesP1itandcleft _ antsasunderrrommptotoeandlaidthemopenlhealpomegmn. amAtthhsuspensefulpointthedelightfulhistorycamietoastop andremninedcurtniledwith'noindioation from'the_ thorwhere thenfissingpartoouldbe-found. _ _ I _ “I - - This me greatly, .hecaose the pleasure trams this .8qu portion at the tho ' slightachancelhad'ofeverfindingthelargerporfion equhed'or soitseemedtometocompletesuch_éninteresfing_ . __1 me as irnpossible and againstall precedent that no scholarly“ person should haveunderhrkentorecord these marvelous ’ ' ts. Suchalackneveramictedthosegknighls-ermnt who, ‘as dosay, set out; advehture's seeking."Each_'one of them had , he or two scribes seemingly created for the purpose. They not recorded " tIy deeds but wrote down the knights'most ' " thoughts however secret they might be. No, a_goOd knight could not haveincurredthe-misfortlmenever havemet with what Plath audiotherslikehim'hlad in ahlmdgnoe. And'soI couldnothringmyselftobelieve that such agnllar'it had‘heen leftmaimedmdmuhlatedIlaidthehhmemeqid . and destroyerqfallthings,whiehhadeithercbncealedorco 1. edit. On theother hand, it struck me that. since among his books therehadbeenfOundsnchmodernonesasI’heEanhWOf [calousyandtheNymphsandShephefrdsoTH " ,hisstOrymust likewisehe modern. Thus, though it might notbe 66 ' Don Quixote existinthememmyofthepeopleofhisvfllageandofthoseinthe neighborhood. This reflection kept me perplexed and longing to know really and truly the whole life and wondrous deeds of our famous Spanimngon Quixoteof lab/lanolin, lightand mirrorof Manchegan'chiv'alry, the first in our age antfiu'theseqevil days to devotehimselftothelaborandexereiseofthearmsofknight-ermnt ry; who righted wrongs,_suecosed widows, damsels, oftheldndfliatmedmfideabonnwhipmhaniontheirpalfreys, withalltheirvirginity.frommountaintomonutainandvafleyto valley.Ifitwerenotforsoinemflian,orboorwifli'ahoodand hatchegormonstrous giant,-that raped them, therewereindays of yoredamselsthatattheendofeightyyears,inallwhichtimethey hadneverslept'a dayundéraroof,wenttotheirgravesas-puteas themathersthathorethém. ‘ " .I say, then, that in these and other respects onrgallant Quixote is worthy of ‘eve'rlasfing and mm: pm Not should praisebewithheld even. fromjm‘e, for the laborandpains‘spentin searchingforthe conclusion ot'this history. I knowWell, nevertheless, that if Heaven, chance, andgoo'd' fortunelhad not hdpedmefliewofldwouldhaveremaineddepfiv'edofanenter- tainmeutaridpleasurethatmaywelloccup'ytheattentivereaderfor acouple'ofhomsorso. " . ' ' This ishnwthedimoverymmade, One day,.as_Ilwasii_i,the of Toledo, aboy came up to sell some notebooks'and old paperstoasilkdealer._As'Iamfondofreadingevensctapsofpaper inlthestreets,mynaturalbentledmet'otakeuponeof'theiiote bookstheboyhadfmxalelsaw‘ritwasinchgacterswhichIrecog. ni'zed as but, despiwthat, was unable to read.'I looked about to'see if there was any SpajnishspealiingMorisona at hand to toad themforme,_andIhadnogreat'dificulty'infindingsuchuninter- " . Indeed, even hadI sought one tor an older and better flee.”th whim-Inshorknhme'pmvidefime wr‘fiione._ ' I ' ' When I told him what I wanted and put the bookfinto his handsheopeneditin themiddleandreadalitile.Thenl_he_began t'olaugh.Iasked'_h_im whathewashughingagand'he that itwilgatsomethhiginanotewritteninthemargiu-ofthebookl -..-“l’n'them.rsin. as 1.13M he replied. soth is Writ- _ten:f‘fThisDulcineadelTobososooften_mention§din'thishis- :tbiy.had,tb'eysay.awbmhandafmwomanai¢aummha .Ifarmmgsu I ‘ I I Part 1', Chapter ' 67 :fiWhenIheardDulcineadelTabosonamei-Iwas with mspnseandamazemenfiiforitoccunedtomeatonce tthese notebooks confimed-thehistoryofDon Quixote. With thisideal urged-himto read the beginning, and-he did so, turning the Arabic mto Castihan at sight. Hetold meit meant, “History of on Quix- . 0f by Gida'Hameta-angeli,‘ an Arab . : -ltrequiredgreatcautiontohidethe’ Ifeltwhea titleof the back reached my ears. Snatclfing the sflkthFdea-Ier, I boughtallthepapenand-notebooksfromtheboyforhalfareal.lf hehadhadhis-mtsabouthimandhadlmownhoweager was,he midithavesafely-mlculatedonmaldngmorefliansix ' bythe bargain. I wrthtirew at once- with the Morison into the thedral begged him to translate all. these notebooks ting to Dongumote into the'Castilian without omitting a ‘ anything, In payment, I ofiered him whatever he pleased. He was schsfiedwzth fiftypoundsofraisins andtwobushels-ofw eat,and piomsedtotranslatethemfaithfuflyandwithafldespa .-Butto makethemattereasier,andnottoletsuchaprecious outof myhanngtookhhntomyhomgwhereinlittle thana monthandahalfhetmnslatedthewholeiustasitisset here. Inthefirst'notebookzmartisthaddepictedthebattlelbetween " DonQuixoteandtheBiscayantotheverylife.'I'heywereplanted imthe same attitude as-the describes, their . raised, hiredoneabowshot-ofi. The Biscayanhadaninscription which “Don Sancho dc Azpeitia," which no .do "must it; . Been his name; and at tlie'feet of. Rocinante was an er that _ sad, Pan Quéwte.” Rocinante was marvelously if, in consumption, that he showed plainly with what 'udgnent and ~ minty the name of Rocinante had been bestowdd upon him. Nearhimwassanchoi’anzaholdingfliehalterofhisas twh foetwasmotherhbdfliatmii‘Sunehochas:"and-a:co ' mt: as - Danvgw’xote morelikelytohaveerred-hydiminishingmtherthanhy fireioasok-Audthis is my own For, where he could and shnuIdhave.-liceirsedhispentopraisesoworthyaknight,heseems mime deliberately to have-written nothing. Thisis ill done and for-it is andiduty'ofhistorians to he andwhollyfree'from'passion; Neither interest nor hatednorloveshouldmakeflremswervefromtherpathof '- ' .whbsemotheris-lnsturyrrivaloffime, storehouseoidee'ds. mmjthepashexampleandcounselforthepresentandwam- the future. In this {know will—he found all the-entertain- menttflrstcanhedesiwd-andifanygoodqnafityislackinglmuina taincitisthefault utils houndofan-author.and-notofthesnbject-. hefbtiei‘,its8eoondl?art, accordingto-the hanslatiemhegantin 3-WSthtrenchantswordsupraisedandpoisedonhithtseemed though'theuuo valiant andwrathful combatants stood threatening heavehnnd'earth and heinoholdwastheirmien.ThefieryBiso cayanwasflre-firsttostrflreahlow,deliveringitwith suchforoeand had-nottheswurdturnedinits comethstsinglestreke would‘havesufioedtoeud'the bitterstrngglea‘ndallthe adventures ofourhrigthutthatgoodfortunewhichreservedhimforgreater firingsrtumedasideflreswordofhisadversarysoflmhthough it smotehimupontthelo'ftshoulder, it-did him no morehurmthanto stripallthat-sideofitsannor, agreatpartofhis hehnetwithhalfot‘hisearJtallfelltothegroundwithafearful dhhavmghhninsonyplight.-. . -. Good God! Who-could properly describe the rage that-filled the heart 05. our Manohegan, when he saw himself dealt with in this fashion?All.thatcanhesaidisthatheagainraisedhimselfin~his stirrupsund,graspinghisswordmorefimrlywithhoth handg'came down un-tlre Biscayan-With such fury, smiling him full over ’the eushiouandoverthehcad, that evensogoodashield pmveduse- less. Itwasasitamountainhadfallenonhim,-andheheganto b1eed.£rom-nose,moufls,-andears,reelingasifahonttofallhack. wards No doubt he would have done so had he not flung'his arms about its neck.- At the same lime-however, he slippedhisfeetbntoftheshrrups‘ and-thennnclaspedhisérms. The mule, the terrible blow, made all across the planandwfiha-few-plunges flungitsmastertothe ground. Don Quixote stoodlookingonverycalmly.When-he'sawtheother fall; he‘leapedfiromhishorse and-with great heiskness mntuwatdhim. Heheldthepointofhisswordtohiseyesandhadehimsumen. .. der,orhewouldenthisheadoE.TheBiscayanmssostunnedthat herwas unablegn‘answer a-.tvord,.md he would haste fared ill, .so hlindedbymge-ivas-DonQuhaotqhaditnotbeenfiortheladiesin thecoarh.Theyhadbeenwatchingthecomhatingreattermr,and a}: Patrcmterri - 69 nowtheyhastenedtovdrere'hestoodendimploredhimwithear- nestentreatiestograntthemthegreatgraceandfavor fsparing theirsquire’slife. Tothis Don Quixoteresponded with grav- ity-and - - - - m! ‘ ' .“Intruth,fsirlndia,”hesaid-,;“Iamwelloontenttodo whstyou ask of rug-but it must beon'one condition and ~' .-This hfigrt-mustpmmisemetogohothevfllageofElTohosandon myhehalfptesenthimselfbeforethepeerlessladyD ’ sothst Shemsydeal-withhhnasshallhemustpleasingtohee” ' ' ‘The terrifiedand disoonsolate ladies-without Don Quixote’s demand-crashingwho Duleinea might he, promised that theirsquineshoulddoallthathadheencommanded. - ' . f‘T’henmn the faith ofthat promise," said Don Quixote, “I shall dohimnofirrther-hnm, though he greatlydeserves it.”- ' Chetme or m PLEASANT nrseounsn mirsssnn “www.mx gum mmsgumn-swcno mnzsl - - By'thisfimeSanchohadgpt.up,rathertheworsefortheham thinghehadteceivedfiomthefiim’muleteeraandwashmtclfing thehattle of_his master, Don Quixote. Inhisheart he praying that it might heGod’s will to grant him {the victory and o enahle himtoviinsomeisland.'I'henSanchocouldhecorne‘its __ or,as hadheenpromised.Seeing,therefpre,lthatthe__ was" grand thatliis master wasremomting Rocinanbs, hen _ achectm'hom thestirrnp. Before Don Quixote could mount,'_ .imcho down on hishees bafore him, took his hand, and kissed it; _ “Mhyit please your worship, Sefidr Don Quixote}? he said, “to giVemBjthegovernmehtof‘theislandwhichhusbeenwo jnthis hard fight. Be itever so Noel myselfwelluhle togo‘jI it as fliarlirflclli‘island'its properlyasanyonem'theworldwhohnev'ergwned ‘_‘Yo_u must take notice; Brother Sancho: Don _ "thatthis adventmeandflroselflceirarenotsavenhnesforwin. ningbntaremerelycrossroad encounters. Nothingisto bew'on exceptabrokenheadoranearthél'essl'usthavepa’ for adventureswillarisefromwhiclilmayrnakeyonnotonlyagover- nonhntsomething more." Sanchognvehimmanythanksandagamldssedhis andthe aldrtofhismafledtunic.HehelpedhimtomonntRocinnnte,and maunfinghisasshinrselfipmoeededtofoflowhismaster, was ' 3 km unsung-rawhide? aims ' Wmmli' " in" . . an of pm them or ' In gnaw. m' W. W. NORTON & COMPANY, INC. Also Publishes ENCusH RENAISSANCE DRAMA: A NORTON ANTHOLOCY edited by David Baa-gum at El. ' THE NORTON ANTHOLOCY 0P AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE WbyflmylnuiscmjnudefloXMcKuyuaL THE NORTON ANTHOLOCY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE Edited by Nina Buym e: at. THE NORTON ANTHOch OI= CHILDREN’S LITERATURE «and byqu Zips: at al. THE NORTON ANTHOLOCY OE ENGLISH LITERATURE Why)". HWMJSW Grunblaucnl. 'THE NORTON ANTHOLOCY OP LITERATURE BY WOMEN EditedbySmde. Gilberto»! Sm Guitar THE NORTON ANTHOLOCY 0F MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY POETRY caubyjamammnuhwawummnabmo'cwr THE NORTON ANTHOLOCY OF POETRY edited byMngamfirgmm Maryjo Salter. MIDI: Sullworthy THE NORTON ANTHOLOCY OI= SHORT FICTION edited by R. u Comm and Richard Ram-h THE NORTON ANTHOLOCY OF THEORY AND CRITICISM edited by Vincent 8. Leach a: at. THE NORTON ANTHOLOCY OF WORLD LITERATURE edited by Sarah [mu at al. THE NORTON FACSIMILE OF THE FIRST FOLIO 0F SHAKESPEARE prepared by Charlton Hiumm 'I‘HE NORTON INTRODUCTION To erERATURE dudbyAlanuEmJ. PEulededly].Mays THE NORTON INTRODUCTION To THE SHORT NOVEL dim! [:me Batty THE NORTON READER dudbyLbIdnl-I. Pmmdjolm c. Em THE NORTON SAMPLER edited byThomu Cooley THE NORTON SHAKESPEARE, BAsED ON THE OXFORD EDITION dated by Stephen emu a «I. ForaeompletefluofNorman-Mcnladldmvidt A NORTON CRITICAL E I'I'ION Miguel cIe CervaT-Ites DON QUIJO'il‘E A NEWTRANSLATICEN BACKGROUNDS AND CO S CRITICISM Translated by dited by BURTON RAFFEL DIANA DE ARMAS UNIVERSITY OF WILSON SOUTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY OF DENVER LOUISIANA E W - W ~ NORTON & COMPANY - New York - London m “I “I Part Two Chapter Nine — in which is narrated the and of the stupendous battle between the gallant Basque and the brave knight of La Mancha We leftofi'the firstpart ofthis historywith the son 1133 ue and the celebrated Don Quiiote, their swords bared and mi efdh ready to smash a furious stroke at the other — a stroke so furious, indeed, that were both blows to have landed squarely on hrget, each man would have been, at the least, split horn top to bottom like an opened pomegranate. And at exactly that moment of dire uncertainty the pleasant tale was broken OE, and left mutilated, nor did the original author give us the slightest idea where we might find the missing part. Now deeply upset me, since the pleasure of reading so abbreviated a narrative was turned into vexation, as I thought of what a hard time I was gorng to have, trying to find the large section which (or so it seemed to me) had to be missing from this delightful story. It shock me as utterly Impossible — tomlly unlike the way such things are done — that there wouldn't have been some learned man who'd make himself responsible for recording the never-before-seen exploits of such a splendid knight, for no such deficiency had ever occurred to any of those knights errant, the ones that everyone talks of, hunting all over for adventure — since each and one of them had one or two learned chroniclers as alike as if made to order) who not only transcribed their heroic deeds lint told us even their silliest thoughts and most childish behavior, no matter how hidden and secret they might have been. It simply could not be that such a fine knight could have been so unfortunate, when Platir and others like him had chroniclers in abundance. Accordingly, I was not persuaded that such a history could have been left mangled and in disarray, 3cm thatlal :nndthlpadcorruepting touch of time, which devours and es . . or had destroyed it, sur y either kept the rest of the story hidden On the other hand, it seemed to me that, since his lib had included such modern books as Iealousy's Home anths and The Nymnlbhs of Henares, his history too ought perhaps to be a modern one — so that, if it hadn't been written down, it might still remain in the memories of hulk fiom his village and also their neighbors. I found this notion hard todeal with, and I longed to know really and truly everyflIi-Bs ghofiomfim’ous Spaniard 50 . - . Mva VOLUME 1, CHAl'l‘Ek 9 51 Don Quiiote's lite and all his heroic exploits, he who was the light and ornament of La Mancha knighthood, the first in our age, and in this whirling time, to set himself the task of knight errantry, and the righting of wrongs, the succoring of widows, the protecting of darnsels — those pure females who rode the land with their cracking whips and their pal- trays, and their staggering virginity on their backs, up one mountain and down another, and out of one valley and into another —— who, were it not fior some vile rascal, some villain with a woodsrnan’s axe a peasants clumsy helmet, some monstrous giant, who ravishes them, d (back in those days) turn into damsels of eighty who had never in eir lives slept asingle rfightunderaroofandwouldgototheirgravesasvirginalasthe mother who'd borne them. I declare, accordingly, that for ese and many other reasons our t Quiiote is worthy of perpetual a d very special praise — and even I shouldn't be denied a bit of it, on count of the hard, faithful work I put in, hunting for the conclusion f this pleasant tale, though I am well aware that if Heaven, circ ces, and good fortune had not come to my assistance, the world would ve had to do without a diversion and an enterminment that should be ble to claim a reader’s attention for almost two hours. And this, then, is how it all happened: One day, when I was in the Alcana [marketplace] at Tole o, a boy came by, selling some old notebooks and other documents to gala- in silks, and since I’m always reading, even scraps of paper I find n the street, it was perfectly natural for me to pick up one of the old no books the boy was selling, which I saw was written in what I knew to be bic characters. But although I recognized the script, I still didn't know hair: to read it, so I went looking for some Moorl who could speak Spanish and read it to me, and it wasn’t hard to find exactly the sort of translator I was looking for — in fact, even if I'd been hunting a difi'erent language. older and better [Hebrew], I'd have found it. Anyway, fate furnished the with a man who, when I told him what I wanted and put the book; in his hands, opened it right in the middle and, reading a bit, began to laugh. I asked him what he was laughing at, and he told me it was something he'd found written in the margin, as an annotation. I asked him to explain what it was and, still laughing, he said: “This, as I told you, is written right here in the margin: “The aforemen- tioned Dulcinea del Toboso, referral to so many times in this history, was seal-igltohavethebesthandforsalfingporkofanywoman inallLaMan- When I heard him say “Dulcinea del Toboso," I was stunned, absolutely astonished, for I understood at once that these old note ooks contained the history of Don Quiiote. Having made this realization} quickly asked I.Cermtesusesherethetermmon'sco, ' adereendantoftheNorthAfi-icaninvadersof yeorrtinuedm bicandtopraeiicetheirlslamiereligionunfil theirofiieial 1609M 613.1nDonQuiiotslI.54(pagdfii-Bofthirvolume), nehamcter RicotetheMoor ealuof“HisMaiesly’sdeereethrea ' suehharshpun— Mmmtdmym'l’hil' III's ' of1609eommandedthe ' under ‘ ofdeath, tnbereadyto king'th withinfiueedaya'l'heseroyaledicls, ' tghtl overs centirya?$patn’sdfiicinlupulrionofflrelews(l492).wereanearlym demfimnolfitlmic 52 Don Qrmo'rs him to read fi'om fire very beginning, which he did, making a rapid trans. lation fiom Arabic into Spanish. And this is what he said: “History of Don Quiiote of La Mancha, written by Sidi [sefior] Hamid Banengeli [eggplant-shaped], Arab historian.” I had to be exceedingly careful to hide the happiness I felt, when these words came to my ears — and matching the old notebooks and docu- ments away from the silk dealer, I bought them all from the boy, paying him half a dollar, though if he’d had the wit, and if he’d understood why I wanted them, he surely could have asked and gotten more than six dollars for the purchase. And then I quickly drew the Moor aside, into the church cloister, and implored him to translate these notebooks into Spanish for me, every single one of them that had to do wifir Don Quiiote, neither omitting nor adding a thing, and I ofi'ered to pay him whatever he wanted. He was happy with fifty pounds of raisins and three bushels of wheat, and promised to translate carefully and well, using no more words than abso- lutely necessary. But in order to get the business done as easily as possible, and to keep from letting such a magnificent discovery out of my hands, I carried him home with me, and in little more than a month and a half he translated everything, exactly as it’s told here. In the first of the notebooks there was an exceedingly realistic painting of Don Quiiote’s battle with the Basque, both of them pictured in exactly the stances described by the story, both raising their swords, one protected by a shield, the other by a coach-cushion — and the Basque’s mule so exceedingly lifelike that you could spot him for a rented animal, even from a long crossbow-shot away. There was a caption iust underneath the Basque, reading: “Don Sancho de Azpetia," which was surely his name, and underneath Rocinante there was another, reading: “Don Quiiote." Rocinante was marvelously well-painted, so big and boney, so thin and lean, with such a spine, so obviously tubercular, that he showed very plainly how wisely and properly he'd been named “Rocinante.” Near him was Sancho Panza, holding his donkey/s halter, and underneath him there was another inscription, reading: “Sancho Zancas,” and apparently, at least as fiir as we can tell from the picture, he was short, with a big belly and long legs, which is why he must have been given the names Panza [belly] and Zancas [long legs], and indeed the history used both names, at one time or another. There are a few other small points possibly worth men- tioning, but they’re really not of much importance — and they have nothing to do with a faithfirl telling of the story, which can never be bad if it’s truthful. And if there is any possible obiection to the truthfulness of the account, it can only be that the author was an Arab, since it’s very natural for people offirat race to be liars. On fire other hand, since they’re so very hostile to us, the author is more likely to have toned down rather than embellishai his tale. Which seems to me, indeed, to have been what happened. since when he could and should have let his pen go, in praise of such a fine knight, he seems to have quite deliberately passed over firings in silence — a serious error and an even worse plan, for an historian should be accurate, trufirfirl, and never. driven by his feelings, so that neithef selfi- interest nor fear, neither ill will nor devotion, should lead him 9W5? fmm VOLUME 1, Cams 9 53 the highway of trufir, whose very mother is history, time's great rival — storehouse of men's actions, witness of time past, esample and bearer of tidings to the present, and warning for the future. An here in this account I'm sure you‘ll find everything you may want, pres ted in the pleasantest way, and if indeed there’s anything worthwhile rnissi I’d blame it on its dog of an author, rather than on any deficiency in the subject itself So this, according to the translation, is how the 3 nd part begins: With the savage swords of the two brave and i ' ted combatants raised on and at the ready, they seemed to b threatening the very heavens, the earth and the fiery gulls with their bol ness. And the firstto rain down his blow was the angry Basque, who d t it with such force andinsuchafuryfiiathad theswordnotswivelldashe swung,that single stroke would have been enough to end the also the entire career of our knight. But some hap ' Don Quiiote for better things, twisted the blade aro ‘ nd so that, though it struck him on the left shoulder, it did him no more damage than to slice ofi' all the armor on that side, knocking it to the und along with most of his helmet and half of his car, all of which c- ttered down with a horrifying racket, leaving him very badly battered. Good God, who could easily recount the rage t now filled the heart of our La Manchan, having been dealt such a s ck! The best we can say is that he reared up once again in his stirrups, tolok a two-handed grip on his sword, and swung so savagely at the Basque, hitting him squarely on the coach-cushion and 'on the head that, tho the cushion had of- fered him first-rate protection, now it was as if a uniain had Ellen on him, and blood began to pour out of his nostrils an his mouth, and also from his ears, and it looked as if he would fall 0 his mule, as indeed without any doubt he would, had he not clutohed at the animal’s neck. But still, his feet fell out of the slirrups, and in a mo ent his arms slipped away, and his mule, terrified by the fearful blow, egan to run through fire fields, and after a few leaps threw his master to e ground. Don Quiiote was watching all this with great cal , and when he saw the Basque fall, he leaped 05 his horse and ran qui y toward him, then put the point of his sword between the Basque's and ordered him to surrender, or have his head cut ofli The Basque was so shaken he could not speak a word, and it would have gone very badly for him, given Don Quiiote’s blind rage, except that fire ladies in the cqach, who had to this point been watching the combat in great distress, urried over and most eamestlybeggedourknightto showthernthegrea grace, andextendto them the great favor, of sparing the life of fireir . To which Don Quiiote replied, soberly and with great pride: “Certainly, lovely ladies: I am deeply pleased to do as you ask of me. But only on one condition, and first is that this knight must promise and agree to ioumey to Toboso and present himself an IF behalf to the peer- less Dona Dulcinea, so that she may dispose of him it best pleases her." Frightened and miserable, not disputing a word or asking who Dulcinea might be, the ladies promised that their page wou d do everything that Don Quiiote had ordered to be done. ' 54 Don gonors “Accordingly, trusting in your word, I will do him no further harm, though he richly deserves it." Chapter Ten — a lively disarssion between Don Quiiote and Sancho Panza, his squire By this time Sancho Panza had gotten to his feet, though somewhat abused by the fi'iars' young muledrivers, and had been watching his master Don Quiiote's combat and praying, in his heart, that God would grant him victory and thereby win some island where Sancho could be made governor, as he’d been promised. So when he saw the battle had ended, and his master was about to mount Rocinante, Sancho hurried over to hold the stirrup for him and, before Don Quiiote could mount, sank down on his knees, grasped his master’s hand and, kissing it, said: “If your grace, Don Quiiote my lord, would please give me the gover- norship of the island you won in this hard fight. No matter how big it might be, I’m sure I'll know how to govern it as well as anyone who's ever governed islands anywhere in the world." To which Don Quiiote replied: “Be advised, brother Sancho, that this adventure, and any like it, are. not island adventures, but crossroads adventures, in which nothing is won except a cracked head or a missing ear. Be patient: in time there will be adventures after which I will be able to make you not simply a governor, but something even more." Sancho thanked him profusely and, kissing his hand yet again, as well as the skirt of his armor, helped his master mount Rocinante. Then he climbed up on his donkey and began to follow along behind his lord, who kept up a rapid pace. Without either saying firewell or even speaking to the ladies in the coach, he headed directly into a nearby wood. Sancho followed him as well as his donkey could manage, but Rocinante was going so fast that, finding himself being left behind, he had to call to his master to wait for him. Don Quiiote obliged him, pulling in Rocinante until his weary squire could catch up. And when he got there, Sancho said: “It seems in me, senor, that we ought to take refuge in a church some- where, because the man you were fighting got left in pretty bad shape and it wouldn't take much for them to notify the police and have us arrested, and by God, if that’s what they do, before we get out of jail we'll be sweating up in our ears." “Silence,” said Don Quiiote. “Where have you ever seen, or for that matter read of, a knight errant being summoned before a court of justice. no matter how many homicides he may have perpetrated?” “I don’t know anything about him-asides," answered Sancho. “I've-never even heard one. All I know is that the police are in charge 0f the fields. I leave all those other things alone." “Then don’t worry, my friend," replied Don Quiiote. "f0! {Wm den“? I VOLUME 1, Cums. 10 55 you out of the hands of the Chaldeans,‘ not to mention the police. But tell me, by your life: haVe you ever seen a braver knight, anywhere in the entire known world? Have you ever read, in all the histories, of anyone who can, or ever could, charge into battle with ch vigor? such spirit and endurance? such skill as a swordsman? or more 'exterity at unhorsing an opponent?" “The truth is," answered Sancho, “I’ve never d any histories at all, because I can't read or write. But what I'd be 'lling to bet is that I’ve never served a bolder master than your grace i all the days of my life, and I hope to God that boldness doesn't cost w t I said it might cost. All I ask your grace is to let me take care of you, bee use there’s a lot of blood coming out of that car and I've got bandages ' t here and some white wax medicine in my saddlebags." “We wouldn’t need any of that," replied Don Quiiote, "if I'd remem- bered to make a vial of that Saracen Fierabras" m, one drop of which would save us time as well as medicine." “What’s a vial?" said Sancho Panza. “And w t balm are you talking ' about?" “A magical balm," answered Don Quiiote, “th recipe for which I carry in my memory, because having it I have no It to fear death, nor con- template dying, no matter what wounds I receive So when I make it, and give it to you, all you'll have to do, for exampl , when you see that in some battle I've been cut in half (which happe quite often), is pick _up the half that fell to the ground and very carefu ly — before the blood dries — put it back on top of the other half, wh'ch will still be sitting in the saddle, fitting it on very tightly and neatly. en quickly give me iust two drops of that balm and, as you'll see for yo elf, I'll be as sound as an apple." “If that’s true," said Panza, “here and now 1 ounce all claim to that island you promised, because all I want, in pa ent for the fine service I‘ve given you so freely, is for your grace to gi me the recipe of this finlastic liquid. I think it’d be worth more than two dollars an ounce, anywhere, and there's nothing else I need to lead an honest, easy life. But I'do need to know, first, ifit costs a lot to make." “For 1 than three dollars," answered Don Quiiote, “you can make a gallon and a half." - “As I'm a sinner!" replied Sancho. “But then what’re you waiting for to make it, your grace, and teach me, too?" “Silence, my friend," declared Don Quiiote. “I plan to teach you greater secrets, and to grant you greater gifts. But, for now, let’s take care of this ear, which hurts more than I should like it to." Sancho took the bandages and medicine out of his saddlebags. But when Don Quiiote saw his shattered helmet, he nearly lost his mind. Placing his hand on his sword, and raising his eyes the heavens, he said: “I hereby swear by the Creator of all th' [ and by the four Holy LAnancientmle. dweflinginMsopotamiaandmenfionedrelvemlfimuintheOIdTestammt z A[ ho whilesackingRome mum hinetaof . In W n ' p can leftover ' fluid'uadlfiarlaua ' : ‘ ' @E‘ In '2'» A New Translation by Edith Grossman INTRODUCTION BY HAROLD BLOOM . 1,005 ’»’ ceca- AnhvdeafHarperColflmPublbbm g g i. 64 Don Qurxors TheBasque,whosawhimcomingathiminthismarmer,wantedtoget ofl'thernule,which. beingoneofthe inferioronesforlfire,couldnotbe uusted,butallhecoulddowasdrawhissword; itwashisgoodfortune, however.tobenexttothecarriage,andheseizedoneofthepillowsand useditasashield,andthetwoofthemwmtateachotherasiftheywere mmlmeminherestofthepeopletriedtomakepeacebetween thembutcouldnoubeoausetheBasquesaidinhistangledwordsthatif theydidnotallowhimtofinishhisflght,hehimselfwouldkillhismis tressandeveryoneelsewhogotinhisway.Theladyinthecarriage, smnnedandfearfiilatwhatshesamhadthecoachmandrivesomedis tance away, and from thereshe watched the fierce contest, in the course ofwhich the Basque went over Don Quixote’s shield and struck a great blowwithhisswordtolusshouldenandifithadnotbeenprotectedby armor, hewould have opened it to thewaist. Don Quixote, whofelt the pain ofthat enormous blow,gaveagreatshout, saying: “Oladyofmysoul. Dulcinea,flowerofbeauty,cometotheaidofthis thy knight, who, for the sake of thy great virtue. finds himself in grave peril!” Saying this, and grasping his sword, and protecting himselfwith his shield. and attacking the Basque were all one, forhe was determined to venture everything on thefortune of a single blow. The Basque, seeing himattackinthisfashion, clearly understood the courageinthisrashactandresolvedtodothesameasDonQuixote. Andsohewaitedforhirn,shieldedbyhispillow,andunableuoturnthe muleonewayor the other, forthe mule, utterly eidiaustedandnot made forsuch foolishness, could nottakeanother step. Ashasbeensaid,DonQuixotewaschargingthewaryBasquewith hisswordonhigh, determined tocut himinhalf, and the Basque, well— protectedbyhispillow,wasmifingforlumhisswordalsoraised,andall the onlookers werefilledwithfearandsuspense regarding theoutcorne ofthegreatblowstheytiueatenedtogivetoeachother,andtheladyin thecarriageandallhermaidsweremakingathousandvowsandoffer— ingstoalltheimagesandhousesofdevotioninSpainsothatGodwould deliverthesquireandthemselvesfromthegreardangerinwhichdrey fmmdthemselves. Butthediffimltyinallthisisthatatthisverypointandjrmcuire,the author of the history leaves the battle pending, apologizing because he foundnothingelsewrittenaboutthefeatsofDonQuixoteotherthan what he has already recounted. It is certainly true that the second au— First Part, Chapter [X 65 m5 ofthisworkdidnotwanttobelievethatso curiousahistorywould bembjected-tothelawsofoblivioruorthatthe trnindsofLaMan— chame liule interestthattheydidnothaveintheir archivesor midngtshlesafewpagesthatdealtwiththis oushrighcandso, with chisel-nought in mind. he did not despair of finding the conclusion to this history, which, with heaven’s help, discovered in the Wabawill be revealed triparttwo.6 Part 'Evo of the Ingenious Gentl an Don Quixote of La Mancha £151., VJ? CHAPTER IX emits stupendous baifle between the gallant Basqusandths valiant Mansksgmiscancludsdandcomestoansnd In part'one of this history, we left the brave Bas ue and the famous Don Quixote with their swords raised and unshea ed, about to deliver two Macks so furious that if they had entirely hit the mark, the combatants would have been cut and split ‘ half from top to bottom'and opened like pomegranates; and at t extremer uncerv Cain paint, the delectable history stopped and was ' terrupted, without the author giving us any information as to w the missing parts conddbefomtd. ' Thismed me a good deal of grief, because pleasure of having mdsosmailanamountwasmrrungintodispl atthethoughtof findfimfltroaddratlayaheadhrfirrdingthelargearnountthaginmy missingfromsoaharmingatale. It seemed impossibleand 5-“=Wsuthof’is&rvanses(dmis.thenmmr).whoclaims, thei'ollowingchsptemo thnrtbemleflonofanorhedfiedomlhmhofsbook. deviaewasoommonin W évcamwmuydivueaumsosmmmmimnedau part'ofDanQidxare) “@mmhakhmmmkmmwjumdmdm .-.. -v-o.1-y-rv - ,rl— 3 - :- .. u _... . .. - .- - .._.\ _..-,_ .- "-1.? _ -1:.I|- 66 Don Qurxo'rs completely contraryto allgoodptecedent thatsogoodalmightshould have lacked a wise man who would assume the responsibility ofrecord— ing his never'before—seen deeds, something that never happened to other knights errant, - memdmpeoplesav gaseamhmgforadvmmml becauseeachofthemhadoneortwowisemenwhosepmposewasnot onlytorecordtheir deeds, buttodepict their slightest thoughtsandfanv cies,nomatterhowsecrettheymightbe:andsogoodalmightcouldnot besounfortunateastolackwhatPlatirandotherslikehimhadinabun' danceJAndthereforeIwasnot inclinedtobelieve that so gallantahis— mryhadbeenlefimaimedmdcfippledandlblamedthemaligmtyof Time, thedevomerandconsumer of all things,whohadeithet hidden it awayorconsumedit. OndieotherhanditseemedtomethatsinceworksasmodemasDe— cepfiamoflealomyandNymphsmdShepherdsafHermes3hadbeenfomid amongDonQuixote’sbooks,hishistoryalsohadtobemodem.and thoughitmightnotbewrittendowmitbadtoliveoninthememoriesof peoplefromhisvfllageandftomothervillagesnearbthisthoughtleft medisconcertedandlongingmlnmwneaflyamitrulyandmitsentiretyg thehfemdmitaclesofomfamomSpaniardDonQubroteoflaMancha, diemodelandpmagonomechegmchivalmandthefirstmomageand hidiesecalamitoustimestomkeupdieexerdseandpmfessionofclfivalv ricamafightingwmngsdefendingwidowaandpmtectingthosemaid' enswhomde,withwhipsandpalfreys,andbeafingalltheirvirginityon dieirbacks,&omm01mtaintomountainandvalleytovalley;andmdess somevillain,orsomefarmerwithhatchetandpitchfork,orsomeenor- mousgiamforcedher,amaidencould,mdaysofyore,aftereightyyearsof nevermmeslwpmgmideramofigotohergraveaspmeasthedayher modiabomhetlsamdiemdiatfordresemidmmyodmreasongom gallantDonQuixoteisdeservingofcontirmalandmemomblepmise,as amI,onaocormtofthetoilandefl’ortIhaVepmintofindingflieconclu— sionofthisamiablehistory,thoughllmowverywellthatifheaven. cirv LThaemmthY mkmfiomabflhiappcaredinAlqufimu’sSpanishmlaflonof PeachbTfimfimlthwghnothingcompambleisinthelmlianoriginaL 2.Awmmmphoemchmkhficdmwmdmthehightbadvmnm0hdfi.fiummplclhad bemmaddhawhmmdmmmhmmemhuonbehgthemvd 3. in £586 and 1587, respectively. First Part, Chapter IX 67 mamasmndfortmedonotassistmefiheworldwiflbedeprivedofdie almosttwqhoursofenterminmentandpleasmetheattentivereadermay deriveftomit'lhisishowlhappenedtofindit: One day wheanas inthe Alana-market in oledo, aboycameby I. 'tosellsomenotebooksandoldpaperstoasilkm'erchmnaslamvery fondofreading,eventornpapetsinthestreets, Iwasmovedbymynatu— 'ralinclinationstopickuponeofthevolumesthe oywasselling,andl sawthatitwaswrittenincharacterslknewtob ArabicAndsinceI recognized but could not read it, I looked around see if some Morisco4 who knew Castilian,-and could read it for me, was ' the vicinity, and it wasnotverydifficulttofindthiskindofinterp ter,foreveniflhad sought a speaker of a better and older language,5 I would have found him.lnshort,fortmeprovidedmewithone,and enltoldhimwhatl wantedandplacedthebookinhis hands,heop itinthe middle, read for ashort while, and began to laugh. I asked him why he was laughing. and he replied that it was because ' ofsomethingwritten inthemarginofthe bookas narmotation. Itold himtotellmewhatitwas,andhe,stilllaughing, : “As-Ihavesaid,here inthemarginiswritten: isDulcineaofTo’ boso, referredtosoofteninthishistory, theysayhad thebesthandfor saltingpork ofanywomaninallofLaMancha.’ ” When I heard him say “Dulcinea of Toboso,” I was astounded and filled with anticipation, for it occurred to me that those volumes con— tainedthehistoryofDonQuixote.Withthisthoughtmmind, Iurged him to read the beginning, which he did, extemporizing a translation of the'Arabic into Castilian and saying that it said: History of Don Quixom af’La Mancha. Written by Cide Hamete Benengeli,6 Arab I neededagooddealofclevemesstohidethejoyl ltwhenthetitleof tbebook reached my ears; moving more quickly the silk mercham, ibmxght all the papers and notebooks from the boy rhalfa real, but if hehadbeenastuteandknownhowmuchIwan thermhecertainly could have demarided and received more than six for their purv chase. I immediately went with the Morisco to the oister of the main Churchandaskedhimtorenderthejournals,all DunQuhroteintotheCastilianlanguage,wi se that dealt with taking away or I 68 DON quxors I addinganythingtothem,offeringhimwhateverpaymenthemightde— sireHewassatisfiedwithtwomobasofraisimandtwquegusof I wheaflandhepromisedtotranslatethemwellandfaithfirllyandvery quickly. Buttofacilitate thean'angement andnotallowsuch awonder— fidfindoutofmyhandalbroughthimtomyhouse, where.inalittle moredzanamontlrandahalflheuanslateddieenfirehismjmrasit recountedhere. is hidaefirstnotebooktherewasaverytealisticdepictionofthebattle ofDonQuixotewiththeBasque,bothintheposturesrecom1tedinthe lustoryitheirswordsraisedmnecoveredbyhismmdsluelddteotherby his pillow, and the Basque’s mule so lifelike that at the distance of a .cxosshowshotonecouldseethatitwasamuleforhire.Atthe mule’s feet wasacaptiondiatreaeronSandwdeAzpetia,which,nodoubt,wasthe Basque'sname; and at the feet ofRocinante was another that said: Don Quinta. Rocinante was so wonderfully depicted, so long and lank, so skinnyandlean.withsoprominentabaekbone,andanappearanceso obviously consumptive, that it was clear with what foresight and accuv racyhehadbeengiventhenarneRocinanteNexttohimwasSancho Paraboldingthehalterofhisdonkey,andatitsfeetwasanothercap— said:SmchoZancas‘,3andasthepicnn-eshowed,he must have hada'higbefly,shortstature,andlongshanks,andforthisreasonhewas .m'thenarnePanzaaswellasZancas,forfromtimetotirnethehistory 'alh'hhnbybodrdresesmnames.Afewodrmdemflswerewordryofno rtieqhuftheyareoflitdeimportanceandrelevancetothenueaccomt =ofthis.history,fornohistoryishadifitistrue. - ffany objectioncanbe raisal regarding the truth ofthis one, itcan its author was Arabic, since the people of that nation are 'veryprunesotelling falsehoods, but hecausetheyaresuchgreat enemies of'mns,itcanbeassumedthathehasgivenustoolittleratherthantoo 'mflLSnitappeammmeforwhenhecouldandshouldhavewielded hispen'mpraisethevirmasofsogoodahughnitseemsheintentionally I passes'dver them in silence; this is something badly done and poorly "thofightougsmcehistorimsuuistandoughttobeexacnuudififl,md v-abseltrtelyfreeofpassimaforneidtermteresnfeaerarmor.nmafl‘ecfion .fihofilfimakethemdeviatefiomthepadrofthetrpdnwhosemothetis Mthefivalofthnemposimwofgt'eatdeedawimastothepast, ampleandadvisertothepresennandfiorewamingtothefimneln -' 7‘. firemanhasisappmflmmlyfifiypoundszmofamkalkdemthandmehuhek '3‘M‘neansw:m.asindimtedmhu.means“hefly’or‘pumh' First Part, Chapter IX 69 this account I know there will be found everything that could be tightly des'red in the most pleasant history, and if something of value is missing ' flush it, in my opinion the fault lies with the dog whe was its author rather than with any defect in its subject. In short. its Second part, ac— cordingtothetranslation. beganinthismanner: Withdieslmpvedgedswordsofthetwovaliantand edcombat' mmheldandmhedonhightheyseemedtothreatenh Veraearthmnd daeabymsuchwastheirboldnessandbearing.nxefirstltostrikeablow was the choleric Basque, and he delivered it with so mflforce and fury diatifhisswordhadnotnrmedonitswaydowmthat' leblowwould havebeenenoughtoendthisfiercecombatandallthe venturesofour knight; but good fortune, which had greater things ' store for Don Quixote. twisted the sword of his adversary, so that al it struck his leftshoulder,itdidnomorethanteartluoughthearmor ngthat-side, mkmgwithitasitpassedagoodpartofhishelmetand arreaeboth ofwhiclyinfearfidmirnfelltothegroundfleaving inaverysad state. Lord savemewhocanaccurately tell ofthe rage nowfilled the heart of ourMancheganwhen he saw himselfso mistrea iSuffice it to sayitwassogreatthathestoodagaininthestimrps, graspinghis -' I swordinbothhands,hestruckhisopponentwithsomufizhfi1rmhitting _ andas ifa mountainhadfallen onhirn, the Basqueb would have come to a bad end, given Don Quixote’s b .-_. gr; '- ‘ ..~.- ". -. tohleedfrom hisMsemrouth,andearsandtoshowsignsoffallingoffthemulemnd hewouldhavefallerynodoubt, ifhehadnottluownhrsarmsarmmd theanimal’s neck, butevensohis feet slipped out of the stirrup: andhis arms loosened, and the mule, terrified by the awful blow.- began to run acrossthefieldand,afterbuckingafewtimes,threwhisridertothe gromd. ' _DonQuixotewatehedverycalmly.andwhenhesawhimfall,he leapedfiomhishorse,racedOVertohirn,placedtlietipofhisswordhe— tweamdieBasqueheyaandorderedhimtosmrmderorelsehewmfldcut ofl’hisheadTheBasquewassomunmdhewuldmtsayawordandhe him square on his pillow and his head, that despite thge‘fmd defenses, lkidmgeifthe ladies in the carriage, who until that moment had watched'the battle with gueatdismay,hadnotapproachedhimmdimploredhim earnestly thathedothernthefavorandgmntthemtheboonof ’ thelifeof theirsquire.TowhichDonQuixoterespondedwithprlde gravity: .- ‘-._ .“Certainly,beauteousladies.lamv¢rryhappytodoas uaskzbutit mustbewithaconditionandastipulatiotyanditisthdtdfisknight 70 Don Qurxo-ra mustpromisetogotoTobosoandpresenthimselfon mybehalftothe ' peerless Dofia Dulcinea, so that she may do with him as she pleases.” 'The frightened and distressed ladies, without considering what Don Quixote was demanding, and without asking who Dulcinea was, prom- isedthatdiesquirewoulddoeverythinghewasorderedtodo. “WithconfidenceinthatpromiserhalldohimnomoreharnLalv thoughhesorichlydeservesit." 1.3;.57‘ CHAPTER X Concerning what further befeIlDon Quinta with the Basque and the danger in which he found himselfwith a hand of Galicians from Yangutxs1 BythistimeSanchoPanza, ratherbadly treatedbytheservantsofthe friars, had gotten to his feet and was paying close attention to the battle wagedbyhismasterandimploringGod, inhisheart, that itwouldbe HiswilltograntDonQuixoteavictory inwhichhewouldwinan [nsula and make Sancho the governor, as he had promised. Seeing, then, that thecombathadendedandhismastermsabouttoremountRocinante. hecametoholdthestirrupsforhim, andbefore DonQuixote mounted, Sanchofelltohislmeesbeforehim,andgraspinghishand,hekissed it and said: “May it please your grace, Sefior Don Quixote, to give me the goverv ncrship oftheinsulathatyouhavewoninthisfiercecombatgforno matterhowbig it may be, I feel I have the ability togovern it just as well as anyone else who has ever governed insulas in this world." To which Don Quixote respondai: “Let me point out, brother Sancho, that this adventure and those like itareadvermrresnotofinsulasbutofcrossroads, inwhichnothingis wonbutabrokenheadoramissingear. Havepatienoe,foradverimres will present themselves in which you can become not only a governor, but perhaps even more." l.(krwntaappmmdydhidedd1hpaflmofflumhmcbapmsafinhebadwflmk,mdhe didwmhmtheadvmwimmebaoquebmhdedmdduGahchmdomtappmform- otherfivechapm _ _ First Part, Chapter X 7 r Sanchothankedhimprofusely,andafterkissing hmdagairuand 1.33:? meskmofhismmhehelpedhimtomounrllo te,andthenhe {j- moantedhisdonkeyandhegantofollowhisrnaster, atarapidpace, without saying goodbyeorspeaking anyfiirtherwi the ladiesinthe carriage,rodeintoanearbywood.Sanchofollowed fastashisjackass would go, but Rocinante moved so quickly that squire, seeing hmdfleftbelmid,wasobligedtocailoohis towaitforhim. .:. _ DonQuixotedidso,pullingonRocinante’sreinsLm ilhiswearysquire mumefimandwhmhediiSanchosaidz refilge insomeclmrcluforthatmanyoufoughtwasso badly injuredthat it m’t be long before he tells the Holy Brotherhoo 2 what happened, andthey’llarrestus,andbymyfaith,iftheydo,b orewegetoutof prison they’ll putus throughaterrible time." “Be quiet,” said Don Quixote. “Where have you ever seen or read “ItseernstomeSefiondmtitmuldbeagoodjdeaforustotake than knight errant has been brought before the w no matter how many homicides he may have committed?” “I- don't know anything about omecils,”3 replied Sancho, “and I neverdidbearoneinmylifegalllhrowisthatthe lyBrotherhood mkescare of people who figlrtintlrecountryside, Idon’t want any— thmgtodowiththat.” “Well,donot trouble yourself, my friend,” Don ' teresponded, “forlshallsaveyoufromthehandsoftheChald nottomention dmseoftheBmdterhoodButtellmeasyouvalue urlife:haveyou everseenamorevaliantknightthanlanywhere nthefaceofthe earthII-Iaveyoureadinhistoriesofanotherwhohas oreverhad. more spirit in attacking, more courage in persevering, re dexterity in womding,ormoreingenuityinm1horsing?” I "Thetruth is,” replied Sancho, “thatlneverread yhistory because ldon’tlmowhowtoreado’rwrite,butl’llwagerthatinallmydaysl’ve neverserVedaboldermasterthanyomgracemndma itpleaseGodthat allthisboldnessisn’tpaidforintheplacelsaid.Whal}Ibegofyomgrace' isthatweneatyommmidgalotofbloodiscoming utofthateanand lbavesomelint‘andalittle white salvehereinthe lebags.” *Noneofthatwouldbeneeded,”repliedDon ote,“iflhadre— l'l’heSarml-Iemmdod.orfloly3mtherhood.wasanarmedfioooe policedthecountryside ;_j 3-SenchooonfuseshmniddimW)sndmwdHos(“gmdges"). " P 4-mmmodmmmhmemwaydutahmbemcomhuedmmdmmodm ...
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This note was uploaded on 02/06/2012 for the course COMPLIT 322 taught by Professor Shammas during the Winter '11 term at University of Michigan.

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Quixote+Part+II+-+Chapter+9+x+3 - w. w. NORTON &...

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