W9-Lu+Xinhua-The+Wounded

W9-Lu+Xinhua-The+Wounded - Copyright @ ms- by Joint...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–10. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 2
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 4
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 6
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 8
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 10
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Copyright @ ms- by Joint Publishing Co. Hongkong Bnmch 9 Quota Victoria Stout, Hongkong Jointly publishud by . Joint Publishing Co. Hongkong Branch :5: _ Gumghwa Company. London _ Pam Published in May, 192:9 - Eiclmml? Distribute-cl in Europe by _ _' Guanghwa Company 9, Narwport H36: '- London, W. C. 2 11.1; _ Printad in Hongkong By {hung Hun Book Co. Ltd. Hongkong Printing Works T5 Pan fining Stmet. Kowloon. Hongkong Huddovcr ISBN afloat-mom Paperback ISBN grammes-9 .'-—I-."_-.-r'n'-r i :1 5:1 :v-uhiphrfl —---'-,- —.— —_ .—-.___._._ -'-.__ Now Stories of the Cullt'ural Revolution 772.st '.-. 'v..'_"" ' ‘ Jointly Published By: . _. Joint Publishing Co. Hongkm} Guanghwa Company, London .-,|_ The Wounded J Lu Xinhua Transferred. :53; Bennett Lee It was Chinese New Yeahs" Eve..0utside the train-window, . nothing was visible but the twinkling of coloured lights that- flash‘ed by. near- and far. This was the spring of 1978. at her watch. It was midnight; She tidied her'long black hair and rubbed her bioodshot eyes gently, then turned and took out a small pocket mirror from her bag hanging .by the window. Adjusting her face to the pale light, she looked at herself in the rnirror.-It was a squarish, pretty face with a I light complexion: a straight nose, thin lips, well-proportioned features, a chin that jutted slightly forward, dark eyebrows and deep-set, quiet eyes that sparkled occasionally in the dim light. She had never scrutinised her own young and attractive face 'so carefullj.r before. As she gazed, however, she saw tears forming in her eyes. With a startled gesture, she clasped the mirror to her breast and cast a sweeping glance around. Only. ' when she saw that‘elterjr'one else in the Carriage was sleeping ' did she relax, heave’a-sighand put the mirror back in~her bag; r' . Shewas tired, but couldn’t sleep.'For a moment-she rested- 'her head in her arms on top of the tea table, but within a few minutes lifted it again. Across from her were a young engaged couple travelling to Shanghai to see their relatives. Theyhad ( Xiaohua turned her gaae back to the carriage and glanced . .- . The Wounded I H to ‘ The Wounded talked animatedly about their studies and work and the ' Hadn‘t her father, when he was alive, told her' how she had - Changod political situation of thepast year but were new- risked her life time after time and braved enemy gunfire to _ worn out and slept leaning against one another. Oh the other - rescue wounded soldiers? How could she have surrendered I - Eider-fl middlfi'flgfld Wflmafl from the city was dozing off next and turned traitor after she was captured and thrown into to a little girl about four or five years old who was' already prison?- ' ' - " _ I When her mother was branded a renegad'e,'-Xiaehua lost all asleep. Suddenly the girl kicked her legs out and cried in. her dream: “Mama!” The woman was startled awake and leaned over to kiss-her daughter’s face. “It’s alright, darling. What's the matter?" But the girl didn’t say anything more and,-after stirring slightly, went back to sleep; - ‘ - I Again silence reigned. Only the train continued to rumble '_ rhythmically, like a lullaby, and the-carriage rocked the her best friends and fellow students and the family had to . move to a small and'dingy room. Because 'of her mother, she , was expelled from the Red Guards and suffered all--Ikinds of ' discrimination. As a result, she hated her' mo'tlier even' more for her treacherous and shameful past. At the same time she couldn‘t forget her mother’s deep love for her, and the fact that her parents had treasured her, their only. child, like a passengers gently asleep. ' - . ' But she still couldn't sleep. Seeing the couple opposite her pearl ever since she could remember. And’now it was like an 9-5 W?” the mflfl‘lfil‘ Hfld Her daughter, she' felt“ a wave of . ugly scar on her clean and fair complexion, a mark of shame. loneliness sweeping over her again. That cry of “Mama!” She had no choice but to criticise her own petit-beurgeeis instincts and draw a line of demarkation between'herself and from the child in her dream was like a knife through the heart. The word had become such a foreign sound to her, yet her mother. She-had to leave her, and the sooner and the what a sense of hope and expectation it stirred up in her _ failith all-“HY the bettfll‘v - - " " ' now! She could almost irnagine the gray hair and weathered I When she took the train that left Shanghai, she .was just a face in front of hen-and wanted to rush immediately'over to young girl of sixteen with a wan face and pigtails. Amongst I I the middle school students who were. going to- the l-" her embrace and beg forgiveness. She shook her head and ,tEHI'S wallod up in her eyes again, but she held them back and ' countryside, her childlike face and lean figure stood out as‘all I took a deep breath. With her headresting in her hands and I _ the more helplessand vulnerable. She sat in a'corner of the elbows on'- the tea- table, she looked out of the window :once . carriage staring out of- the window; None of the other 333m- ' l . -.-' ' ' students came over to talk to her, nor did she try to talk to 5HNifl‘3 Years hate Passed by" n.” she recalled with .' I - ' anyone else. It wasnit until' the trainsped intoamountain bitterness. - - - " V— ' ' ' ' , I tunnel that she looked up'at the'two pieces-‘of luggage on- the rack above which were hers — a canvas'hag and‘a'bedding - That. was when she had struggled with-her own. sugar I against her ‘renegade' mother. Hermind in-a turmoil, she had ', . roll which she had packed carefully behind her mother’s signed up to go down to the countryside before graduation. back. Right up to'the time that she-beardedthe train with It- was so hard to comprehend: howher mother, a'ulong-time ' her classmates, her mother had been completely unaware of _, - revolutionary, was something that-crawledieut of an enemy 5 her plans. She will probably have arrived hflmfi by HOW: she dog-hole, a figure like the character Daiyu in" the novel Song the note left on the table of Youth, to he hated and detested. ' , ' She hoped that the charge would prove to be untrue. 1 thought, and would have seen which read: I I am breaking with you, and with this family. tr ' .' The Wounded Don’t try to find me. ' I . _ -- '-_ - " . Xiaohua , June 6, 1969 .She would cry, Xiaohua thought, and perhaps be hurt. And-even if she herself couldn’t forget .the loving care that she had received since childhood she must show no pity, she told herself. After all, she was a traitor, even if she was my ‘ mother. . ' I - I ' - ' --The train-had by then quieted down. It was only then that ' she noticed the students around her — some sleeping, leaning back,,against their seats, and others reading. The young man ' 'ablout'ihler- agelsitting opposite her was staring at her in curiousity, She looked down in embarrassment, but he asked _ -.;,her-'in a- friendly way: “Which year are you?” “1969” she .arep'liedl,.-raising"-her head. “1969?” he echoedin surprise. “Then -you-..,;.-"‘- “I graduated ahead of schedule.” When she Said :this 'mueh,*her_‘ eyes brightened for— a.-moment, as “if _ grateful for his concern.-She took the opportunity oflooking- him over. He was of medium height, fair-complexionEd'with a pair of lively"‘eyes. “What’s your name?” “Su Xiaolin. And yours?”“-‘Wang Xiaohua".-sh_e answered, blushing. , Several" studentsxwho' had overheard their conversation" stopped reading and broke in. -”Wang Xiaohua, how didyou managfi‘vi-to graduategahead. of schedule?” She was dated fora . moment, then thought she' would try to- bluff hen-way- through,--.but she was never a very-good liar and in the 'end ,told them the truth. When she finished her story she hung her “head, fully--_ expecting 'them. to'give her a cold reception. Instead, they reassured and-'comforted her sympathetically. ' Su 'Xiaolin said: “You’ve done the right thing. Don't worry, whenwe get to the countryside we‘ll all help you out.” ' Xiaohua thanked them. all-with much gratitude. _ Time passed and as she became accustomed to the warm Support of collective life, Xiaohua beganto free herself from the bitter memories of 'her family landlalong with the other students from Shanghai began to settle down in, a coastal” - village in Liao'ning province in the northeastern part of China. - The Wounded ‘ 13 She made steady progress'and in the following yearmade an application to join the Communist Youth League. To her q' surprise, they turned her down, citing the fact-that 'her mother was a renegade. . -When she found out, she went to see the League'Branch Secretary in tears and pleaded with him’: “I’ve broken off all relations with my family and have nothing to do with my mother anymore. You must have known all this ...” Su Xiaolin and several other of her friends confirmed this. “It’s true. Last year her mother found out that she was here and . sent a parcel of clothes and food, but Xiaohua sent itback without even opening it. Even the letters that her mother _vvrote she sent back without even openng them.” “Yes, 'I know”, said the League Branch. Secretary: with regret, “but” ' Shanghai has sent ,a letter of -hrves.tigation.to our-League}. Committee here. And 'then'.’ the provincial leadersihip has. always put great stress -on.this ...” .He gave a-shrug and a bitter, helpless smile. . . ' ' Xiaohua was at a loss as to what-to'do. It wasn‘t until the spring of. her fourth there that she was reluctantly admitted into theYouth League. By that time, she no longer felt so excited by'it any more.-' - - - Chinese New Year came again. This was. the hardest time for her. One by one the young people-living there 'went'horne " ' to viSit their families, leaving “her alone inf-tiredonnitory. '-Outside,- the air was pungent 'with the smell oft-gunpowder as. firecrackers were set off to welcome the New Year and children everywhere were singing; shouting and‘dancing. The sounds of drums and gongs rang out through the night. The little joy she did have came when some” peasant families had her over to their homes, .but once she went back . to her empty room it was even more depressing than before. .l-ler only comfort was the sincere concern and support that the peasants showed her. They had written many times‘to the _ League committee demanding approval other application for- Youth League membership. Su Xiaolin also oame'to see 'her_'__ 14 ' The wounded often. Over the past years of living and working'together, a close and warm relationship had- developed between them. Su Xiaoiin liked her for her innocent and honest character and for her hardworking spirit. She on-her part thought of him as the only person in the world that she could trust and often poured out her inner troubles to him. Since that evening on the beach when they had had a heart-to—heart talk, they had become even closer. _ After a long stroll along the beach,'_they had sat- down on ' the sand. Before them, under the moonlight, stretched the sea. An onshore breeze—brought the smell. of'=the oceanin. alongwith the washing. sound of the waves on the shore. I They were silent for a time, then Xiaoiin suddenly asked her: “Xiaohua, do you miss your family?” She was taken by . surprise, but raised her head and, after a moment's hesitation, 1 replied: ‘-‘No. Why are you asking me that?” = “You know, Xiaohua,.-I.think you ought. to write home and ask about your mother. Lin Biaowas responsible for persecuting a lot of old cadres. Your mother just mighthaye' been'one'of them.” ' ' . ‘ ' ' . “No. It’s not possible” said Xiaohua, fingering a corner of her coat. She shook her head in anguish, “I’ye considered it so many times before, but it’s impossible. I- heard that Zhang . Chunqiao himself handled her case and-'gaye the verdict. It_ couldn'thaye been a mistake? She shook her head again.- Xiaolin finally sighed and began speaking his thoughts aloud angrily. “Chairrnan'Maof said that there are bound to factors that a person derives, from his or her class or family origin, but-what is decisive/is aI-personis actual deeds.--:-Yet it seems that ‘like father,- like son’ is dominant in politics and that if on'e’s parents are -'reactionaries,.-then the offspring can’t belotherwiser" '- - - ' '- .' - "-' -. - ' It wasbeginnhig‘toget'chilly. Seeing that Xiaohua only had a thin jacket.on-,'he.askedt-“Are you-cold??? “No.” She gazed. at him- with feeling, “How. about you?” He lowered -his.eyes again-and gazed silently out at the shimmering water, ... Lr'ang Zheoxr'oa The Wounded _ 1? “Xiaohua, do you think, it‘s wrong'for a revolutionary to have emotions?" She couldn‘t answer him as - thoughts of her own life brought the pain back to her again. -- When Xiaolin turned and saw the tears welling up in her ‘ eyes, he tried to say something to comforther, but he could hardly hold back his own tears. Finally he blurted out what he had been keeping in-for such a long time. _“Xiaohua, you . haven‘t got- any family to depend on. If you believe in me, then then let us be good friends!” Her heart was pounding.- She looked at him with astonishment and disbelief. “Really? Do you really mean ...'?" “Yes, I r'nean_it,_of course, 1 do." ‘ affirmed Xiaolin', offering his, hand in warm friendship. “Xiaohua, trust me!” .She fell into his arms and embraced him. _ A smile reappeared on Xiaohua the dormitory her sunny yoice cou often, singing happily. Her face regaine shone with a youthful glow._ The following autumn, b , _ because they needed teachers in, 'the local village school,_ Xiaohua was transferred thereto teach. Xiaolin was shifted to a job in the commune office. ' ' " 'I ' ' One afternoon, after attending a staff meeting there, she, went to Xiaolin’s dormitory. The door to his room was unlpcked, but he wasn‘t in. ,As she picked up some of his dirty clothes to wash forhim, she happened to. see his diary on ‘the small table near his bed. When she casually flipped through a few pages,_she happened to read what was written the night before: - ' _- ' _ ' l have a real' headache-today. Secretary Li . told me this morning that the county Party committee was planning to transfer me to the propaganda department,‘ so' they re looking into- my political background; ' that the County committee had stressed that my relationship with Xiaohua was a problem then spoke again. ’5 face. In the fields and in Id be heard more and more d a healthy colour and is ' Ellie Wouiideti of world outlook and class line. If it continued, they would have to reconsider my transfer. I just can’t. understand this - rationale... _ .- - ' Xiaohua was stunned. She left the room-hurriedly and walked back to' her'schoel in' a” daze, only crying when she had lain down-on her bed. ; The next morning after breakfast, head throbbing. She went straight to the Secretary of the County Party committee and said to him- calmly: “Secretary Li, “I’m breaking off with Su Xia'olin. Please don’t let my association with him affect his future." I After this, it was asif she had become a different person, even more Iimpassive and taciturn than before. Although Xiaolin refused. the job at the county level and tried to court ' her as before, she deliberately. avoided him. By now, she had realized that her own status would not change and-that the 1. noose around her own meek would else encircle anyone who I _ associated closely with her. While she did truly love Xiaoiin, she felt that it would be wrong to involvezhim in any trouble. The 'doctor had told her that her health might improve if she got married, but she was prepared to'I sacrifice her own - happiness for his. She made upjher mind to never again open up herheart to anyone. ' " ' ' - ' ' , . ' -IFrom this time on she channelled all her love and attention onto the schoolchildren that she taught. She spent her savings onIbuying them school supplies and Idevotcd her evenings to helping them review their lessons. The close bonds that - developed between herself and the children helped her to forget, for the time being, all that had gone before. I I Another two years went by. Xiaohua had matured into a. young woman. After the fall' of the Gang of Four, she felt more relaxed and at ease and began te smile again. When she took part in a' parade, demonstration organized by the ' villagers to celebrate their downfall, she was, moved as she had scarcely been before. But when she fell to thinking of the The Wounded -- l9 ' a would la se once more into melancholy. I I pastg:fmdney5has she wasgloolcing over someIof her student s " exercises, a friend handed her' a letter with the postmark Jiangsu province on it. Who could it be from? Shewondered. When she opened the letter, she discovered that rt was from her mother. The-address had changed. If it had been before,- perhaps she would have torn it up right away, but this trmc she couldn‘t help but read it through. ' Dear Xiaohua: It has been 8 years now since you broke off relations with me. It was not your-fault and I don’t blame you for it. ljust want to tell-you that my case has “been rectified andlthat the - incorrect verdict passed on 'me has been x reversed. The ‘renegade’ label put on me'has been overturned as part of the plot of the Gang of Four to seize power. I ' I am now back-at my old school post in a leadership position. Unfortunately, my health has been poor these past few years and' I’m suffering from severe ' heart trouble and . rheumatic arthritis. Still, I’m determined to do what I can for the Party. II ' Xiaohua, it‘s been eight years since l last - saw you. I want to come. and see you but my health won’t allow it. Please, can you come to. see me, as soon as possible? With love, Mother 20.12.]??? Xiaohua was'dumbfounded. “Can it be true?” she asked - ' herself. “Her heart was pounding. - I At ten o’clock in til-elevenng Xiaohua lay on her bed- reading. the letter over and over again. SomehowI-it was as if she were already home, opening the door of than old- home and seeing her mother at the'table, writing. When she looked up, her mother cried out in ,surpriseI: “Xiaohua! and rushedI_ I so I The Wounded over toward her. Overcome with emotion, she embraced her mother in her arms. After a while, she-lifted her head, wiped the tears from her eyes and asked: “Mother, what are you writing?” “Nothing. It‘s nothing at all.” She tried to hide the paper from her with a sudden look of terror. Xiaoh‘ua quickly snatched the paper and read on it the words . “Supplementary ConfessiontIJn My Case Asr'A Renegade”. Xiaohua stared at her and cried.out: “You’re. shameless!” Then she tumed abruptly to walk out. “Where are you going?" “It’s none ‘of your business!"" But her-mother one step ahead of her and "blocked-the door, hair dishevelled. Suddenly Xiaohua screamed and came back to her senses. ' _ She was alone on her own bed. Panic-stricken, she sat up and felt her own heart beating wildly. “Should I go to see her?” wondered Xiaohua aloud. She copldn’t make up her mind. Two days before Chinese New. Year, after receiving an official letter from the school where her mother worked, Xiaohua quickly packed her luggage and caught'the earliest - train for Shanghai. -‘ a _ - ., 'So now she sat on the train, heading for Shanghai. How could'she calm herself 'down? On the one hand she was excited and happy, yet on the other hand miserable and full of regret. I - _ ' I At daybreak on the first day ofthe Chinese: New Year, the train entered the Shanghai station. with. a confident, prolonged whistle. . -' When she got off the train, Xiaohua walked all the way down the platform with-the little girl and her mother and saw them off at a bus stop. Only then did she jump on a number - IS tramcar, one bag hanging from her shoulder and the other grasped firmly in her hand,'and head for home. ' - ..0utside the tram window vvere familiar-street scenes and- buildings from her childhood. The thought of - going home filled her with a special happiness. She thought to herself: It’s Spring Festival. I wonder what mother is doing now? She doesn't like to sleep in so she must be up by now. When I The Wounded 2‘ open the door, she‘ll probably be having breakfast. Then I‘ll just sneak up quietly and call out to her in a gentle voice so that she’ll be startled and turn around and see me. Then- she’ll be so surprisod that she’ll cry - ._ . With these thoughts in her head she got off the tram, turned into 954th Lane and counted the address numbers: 16-18-20. At 20 she stopped and went? up to the familiar brown door. Trying to restrain her excitement and nervousness, she tapped twice. No answer. Perhaps she’s not“ up yet, she thought. She knocked again, louder this 'time. Still no answer. Now a little anxious, Xiaohua pounded on .- the door. Butthe house wa'slstill silent. - ; ‘_ I A little girl suddenly appeared behind her, half-chewing a piece of cake, and asked her: “Who are'you looking for? The people in that place moved out three days ago.” “Where did she go?“ tasked Xiaohua. The little girl hesitated, then ran'_ ,back to her house. A. moment later, a woman in her thirties came out. “Are you looking for Mrs. Wang, the principal? She’s moved to No. 1, 816th Lane. May I ask who you are?” Xiaohua paused for a second, then answered with a smile: “I have some business with her. Thanks.” Xiaohua went to No. l, 316th Lane and found a newly-built dormitory for workers. When she. saw a pot of plum blossoms, her mother‘s favourite flower, on the door step, she knew she had come to the right place. ' But the door was closed. Perhaps she’s not feeling well and stayed in bed, thought Xiaohua. Before she could knock at the door, a middle-aged man brushing his teeth outside No. 2- cailed out to 'her: “Areyou looking for Mrs. Wang? She’s not here-She fell ill yesterday and was taken to? the hospital.’."" Xiaohua gave a start. “Which hospital? Do youknow-the room number?” The man shook his head-“I’m sorry: I don’t— ' know.” Xiaohua asked if she could leave her inggage there for . the time being and rushed off in the direction of the local hospital. 22 The Wounded It being New Year’s Day, the corridor of hospital‘was empty. She ran up to the information desk but found noone there. When she turned around she saw several white-coated doctors coming around the corner talking to one another. Xiaohua went up to them. and asked: “Excuse me, doctor, but can you tell me which room Mrs. Wangis in?" One of them, a.thin man wearing glasses, looked at her for moment, then, as if remembering something, handed her a note which was in his hand. “You must be from her school. see has been seriously ill. Could I ask you to send a cable to her daughter? Here‘s the address. Mrs. Wang passed away' this morning. Please tell her ...” “No No." Xiaohua stared ahead in shock.'Suddenly she began-to walk forward, then stopped. “Which which_ room?“ The doctor pointeddown the hall, ‘fNumber'2.” She stumbled down the-hall in -a daze and pushed open the door. All the people in the room turned around and stared at - her. She pushed her way through them and made her way to _ the side of the bed. With trembling hands, she'drew aside the sheet covering her mother’s face. It was a face that she'hadn’t seen in nine years, a face lost to her forever. _ Her mother’s face was pale and wan, framed by grey hair, and revealed scars of old wounds faintly visible among the creases on her forehead. The eyes were*still half-opened in a tranquil gaze as if waiting for something. . ‘_‘Mamal” The-word thatshe had kept suppressed for nine year'scame out in a heart-tending cry. “Please look. at me! Mama, I‘ve come back.“ She shook her mother’s arm but there was no answer. - After a long time when her crying had subsided, she looked around vacantly at the people in the room. Tears were running down their faces as well. Among them she caught sight-of a very familiar face, young and handsome, that-was . also clouded in sorrow; It was So Xiaolin. She almost cried out to him, but he spoke first: f‘Xiaohua, it’s alright. It’s all over how.” The Wounded 23 The following day after the cremation at Longhua, Xiaohua and Xiaolin walked quietly along the bond: by the river where she had spent so much of her childhood. It was already very late and a penetrating wind was blowing in from , the river. She leaned against him and felt her cold heart warmed by his presence._She was grateful to him. When .he. had learnt that her ailing mother had been rehabilitated, he had gone immediately to see her on his vacation time. And when he heard that she had fallen seriously ill, be had rushed to the hospital in the middle ofthe night to see how she was. So they had met, and he had looked after her in her daughter‘s place, though only for a short time. This thought was a comfort to Xiaohua. They walked silently under the street lamps. Suddenly I .Xiaolin remembered the diary and took it out of his pocket, turned it to the last page and gave it to Xiaohua to read. “Your mother wrote this before she died, the night before yesterday.” Under the dim lamplight, she read: to' this day I’ve been longing for my child to come back, but she hasn’t come yet. Now, seeing Xiaolin, I find I miss hen even more. While she hasn’t been as physically mistreated as i was by the Gang of Four, the wound in her heart will be much worse than all-the wounds on my body. This is why I’m so anxious to see her again. My life is almost over, but I’ll try to hold on for a few days more so that I can see her again Xiaohua’s eyes blurred with tears. She left Xiaolin and ran to the river’s edge. Leaning against the wall, she gazed absently at the shimmering lights on the water’s surface. After a while, she raised her head. The agitation on her face tumed to a quiet anger. She held Xiaolin’s hand tightly and with eyes shining spoke slowly and with emphasis: “Dear _ mother, rest in peace. 1 will never forget who was responsible __ ' for your wounds and mine. I shall never forget Chairman I 24 The Wounded _Hua‘s kindness and closely fellow. the Party’s Central Cemrnittee' headed by him and dedicate-my life to the cause of the Party.” ' . ' ' The night was peaceful and the‘ eurrent ef the Huangpu river flowed swiftly to the east. Suddenly from the distance came the sound of a ship’s-whistle. Xiaehua felt a surge'erf resolve and, taking Xiaeliri by the arm, together walked with him dawn the stone steps and with big strides headed toward the bright lights ef Nanjing Read. ' ...
View Full Document

Page1 / 10

W9-Lu+Xinhua-The+Wounded - Copyright @ ms- by Joint...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 10. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online