Ch8 - Ch.8 The state of Newspapers Newspapers o Newspapers...

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Ch.8 The state of Newspapers Newspapers o Newspapers historically act as chroniclers of daily life Inform and entertain o In the digital age, the industry is losing readers. 2007- total newspaper ad revenues fell 7% overall, despite 20% increase in online ad sales o losses raise big concerns for future of the newspaper The evolution of the American newspapers o colonial papers Benjamin Harris: Publick Occurrences (1690) Inflammatory by standards of the time Not a newspaper by a modern standard Banned by the colony after one issue o John Campbell: the Boston News-Letter (1704) Reported on events that took place in Europe months ealier o James Franklin: The New England Curant (1721) Stories interested ordinary Readers o Benjamin Franklin: The Pennsylvania Gazette (1729) Run with subsidies from political parties as well as advertising. AN Add from the Gazzette Two types of Colonial Papers o Partisan Press (political papers) Pushed the plan of the political group that subsidized the paper o Commercial press Served business leaders interested in economic issues. The penny press era (1820) o 1833- Benjamin Day’s New York Sun Fabricated stories ( blazed the trail of celebrity gossip) Local events, scandals, and police reports Human interest stories o 1835- Bennet and the new york morning herald an indie paper serving middle/low class readers o 1848- formation of the Associated Press (AP) Wire services around the country o Contributions Developed a system of information distribution
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Ch8 - Ch.8 The state of Newspapers Newspapers o Newspapers...

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