American Oratory-exam 2-1

American Oratory-exam 2-1 - Founding America 27/10/2011...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Founding America 27/10/2011 21:35:00 Revolution -declaring American Independence from Great Britain J. Hancock, “Boston Massacre Oration”—RK 98 P. Henry, “Liberty or Death”—RK 108 G. Washington, “Speech to the Officers of the Army” Events leading to Revolution- Stamp Act, British tea monopoly, Intolerable Acts As Revolution neared, Britain tried to strengthen its control over colonies Militants (e.g. Hancock) stepped up their rhetoric persuasion However, American colonists were quite divided about the question of independence. .even many of the militants simply wanted to make Britain respect their rights as “British citizens” Making sense of the “Acts” The British passed a series of Acts that enraged the colonists Stamp Act- 1765- imposed a tax which required printed materials be printed on stamped paper Tea Act- 1773- imposed no actual tax, but made possible the sale of British tea at bargain prices which undercut local merchants Tea Party- 1773-response to Tea Act; protesters destroyed tea that was supposed to be sent back to Britain Intolerable Acts- 1774- also called Coercive Acts, passed in direct response to the Boston Tea Party; Colonists saw this as a violation of their Constitutional rights “No taxation without representation” John Hancock President of Second Continental Congress President of Congress of the Confederation First Governor of Mass.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
First to sign Declaration of Independence Became a smuggler Arrested for treason Only person to sign declaration on the 4th Most Useful as a fund raiser Boston Massacre 1770- incident occurred where civilians in Boston were killed with British troops present in the city. most of the soldiers were acquitted; only two charged with manslaughter Boston town meeting issued a report, pamphlet, which publicized incorrect information; “Horrid Massacre” An annual commemoration was held for the event on March 5 until after the Revolution o Reiterated false info; powerful emotional appeal, resentment Hancock was responding to the Boston Port Bill His message reached all the colonies via pamphlet o These commemorations reinforced popular sentiment (or resentment); powerful emotional appeal Boston Massacre Oration Exigency: o Ritual of the Massacre speech o yearly commemoration address o no taxation theme o “we fear not death”; patriotism o “this people will never be enslaved with their eyes open”
Background image of page 2
o calls for the establishment of a “congress” o How does he characterize the British? Bloody butchers Murdering tyrants Constraints o Divided audience o Doesn’t constrain himself in how he characterizes the British and in what he is telling the audience to do Rhetorical Audience o Anyone who could read or heard the speech read “vermin will forever be swept from the streets of Boston”—British soldiers “I conjure you by all that is dear, by all that is honorable…”
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/02/2012 for the course COMM 327 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Texas A&M.

Page1 / 28

American Oratory-exam 2-1 - Founding America 27/10/2011...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online