Ch09_Lecture9.2

Ch09_Lecture9.2 - Chapter 9: The Russian Domain FALL 2011...

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Chapter 9: The Russian Domain FALL 2011 Lecture 9.2
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The Legacy of Slavic Dominance The heritage of the Russian Empire Growth of the Russian Empire Slavic “Rus” in power from 900 CE around Kiev Eastern Orthodox Christianity came in 1000 CE By 1400s, new and expanding Russian state after Tatar and Mongol rule Expansion eastward in 16th and 17th centuries; westward expansion slow Final expansion of Russian Empire in 19th century in Central Asia By 1900, Russians were found from St. Petersburg (on the Baltic) to Vladivostok (on the Sea of Japan) FIGURE 9.2 A Cossack, native of the Ukranian and Russian steppe
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Tsarina Catherine the Great ruled the Russian Empire between 1762 and 1796 and expanded imperial influence over portions of southern Russia, Ukraine, and the warm- water coastline of the Black Sea.
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Russian Empire collapsed in 1917 Briefly, a broad-based coalition of businesspeople, workers, and peasants replaced tsars
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Bolsheviks (faction of Russian Communists representing the interests of the industrial workers), led by Lenin, centralized power and introduced communism (economic system)
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The Soviet system under Lenin was somewhat less strict as far as personal democratic freedoms were concerned Lenin's Tomb
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In 1930, Soviet leader Stalin centralized power in Moscow, limiting national autonomy
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Communism did not eliminate ethnic differences Soviet leaders designed a geopolitical solution to maintain the country’s territorial boundaries and theoretically acknowledged the rights of non-Russian citizens by creating union republics
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Autonomous areas: minor political subunits designed to recognize special status of minority groups within existing republics Buryats of northern Siberia, Buddhist s Yakuts
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Communists instituted centralized economic planning:
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Ch09_Lecture9.2 - Chapter 9: The Russian Domain FALL 2011...

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