Binary Code — WSU

Binary Code — WSU - Binary Code - WSU

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Binary Code Binary Code Microprocessors are programmed with and operate in binary code. The values from all inputs form sensors and switches are converted to binary from before they are read by the microprocessor. All memory read and write operations, all serial data communication, and all output commands are performed with binary code. To understand the binary number system, the number system we use every day must be reviewed first. Our number system is a base 10 number system. This means there are 10 different digits that we can use to make any number we want. The numbers are 0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8 and 9. As shown below, each numerical position in the base ten number system has a value that is ten times the value of the previous position. Computers use the base 2 number system. This means there are 2 different digits, called bits, that we can use to make any number we want. The bits are 0 and 1. Eight bits make a byte. One million bytes makes a mega-byte. One billion bytes makes a giga-byte. As shown below, each numerical position in the base two number system has a value that is two times the value of the
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/06/2012 for the course AUSV 1320 taught by Professor Johnkelly during the Winter '12 term at Weber.

Page1 / 2

Binary Code — WSU - Binary Code - WSU

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online