L03 - TEP1281 Ethics and Professional Conduct Session 2,...

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Faculty of Information Technology & Faculty of Information Science and Technology , Multimedia University Malaysia TEP1281 Ethics and Professional Conduct Lecture 3: Critical Thinking Skills And Logical Arguments Session 2, 2011/2012
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Faculty of Information Technology & Faculty of Information Science and Technology , Multimedia University Malaysia Contents 1. Critical Thinking and Logical Arguments 2. Constructing an Argument 3. Valid Arguments 4. Sound Arguments 5. Invalid Arguments 6. Inductive Arguments 7. Fallacious Arguments 8. A Seven-Step Strategy for Evaluating Arguments 9. Identifying Some Common Fallacies
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Faculty of Information Technology & Faculty of Information Science and Technology , Multimedia University Malaysia Critical Thinking and Logical Arguments • Brook Moore and Richard Parker (2007) define critical thinking as: the careful deliberate determination of whether we should accept, reject, or suspend judgment about a claim. • Claims, or statements, can be used in a form of reasoning called a logical argument or argument . 1
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Faculty of Information Technology & Faculty of Information Science and Technology , Multimedia University Malaysia Logical Arguments An argument can be defined as a: form of reasoning that attempts to establish the truth of one claim (called a conclusion ) based on the assumed truth of the evidence in other claims (called premises ) provided to support the conclusion. 1
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Faculty of Information Technology & Faculty of Information Science and Technology , Multimedia University Malaysia Arguments (Continued) • An argument has three important characteristics or features in that it: (i) is a form of reasoning; (ii) is comprised of claims (sometimes also called statements or assertions); (iii) aims at establishing a conclusion (i.e., one claim) based on evidence (provided by other claims called premises ). 1
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Faculty of Information Technology & Faculty of Information Science and Technology , Multimedia University Malaysia Structure of an Argument • Premise 1 • . optional • . optional • Premise N optional • Conclusion 1
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University Malaysia Argument structure continued Premise 1 . When I recently visited the Computer Science Department at the University of Hiroshima I noticed that graduate students and professors there were field testing a new computer chip, whose code name is Chip X. Premise 2 . I have a copy of the design specifications for Chip X, which shows that it will be several times faster than any chip currently available in the US. Premise 3 . Lee Smith, a mutual colleague of ours who was recently an exchange student in the computer science program at the University of Hiroshima and who participated in the field testing of Chip X, will corroborate my account. ________________________________________ Conclusion
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This note was uploaded on 02/03/2012 for the course IT 1281 taught by Professor Ain during the Spring '11 term at Multimedia University, Cyberjaya.

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L03 - TEP1281 Ethics and Professional Conduct Session 2,...

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