chm115_lecture23

chm115_lecture23 - Chemistry 115 Lecture 23 Outline Chapter...

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Chemistry 115 Lecture 23 Outline Chapter 10 – Organic Compounds Polymers Don’t Forget EXAM III, WED April 13, 6:30-7:30 Recitation: Chapter 10.1-4 Exam Review
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Alkenes couple together to create long chains “monomers” polymers Polymers Polymers: important materials Produced in great quantities Properties vary to a great degree
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Natural rubber, a polymer Natural rubber occurs in the liquid known as latex, which comes from a rubber tree. Soft and sticky Slowly oxidized by air Stabilized by vulcanization. Most books have it that Charles Goodyear (1800–1860) was first to use sulfur to vulcanize rubber . However ancient Mesoamericans achieved the same results in 1600 BC.
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Vulcanization Although Goodyear first used sulfur to vulcanize rubber, neither he nor his family were involved in the Goodyear Tire Co. He sold the patent. natural rubber
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Artificial rubber In 1935, German chemists synthesized a rubber, known as GR-S (Government Rubber Styrene), a copolymer of butadiene and styrene . This became the basis for U.S. synthetic rubber production during World War II when natural rubber was no longer available. By 1944 a total of 50 factories were manufacturing it, pouring out a volume of the material twice that of the world's natural rubber production before the beginning of the war. Now called SBR, this polymer remains the primary synthetic rubber for the manufacture of tires.
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Artificial rubber, SBR Styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) contains 20-23% styrene. Styrene 1,3-butadiene
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ABS rubber, a more advanced tire compound: Better wet traction, polar C-N bonds improve internal adhesion.
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1 kg of ABS requires 2 kg of petroleum for raw materials and energy to run the reactions. 6.36 x 10 8 kg of ABS, a year’s production, requires 9,780,000 barrels of oil for its production. The US imports about 10,000,000 barrels a day, ~55% of the oil we consume. Every barrel of oil that is burned is one less barrel of
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chm115_lecture23 - Chemistry 115 Lecture 23 Outline Chapter...

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