EE3530-overview

EE3530-overview - EE3530 Introduction to Control...

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EE3530 Introduction to Control Engineering Kemin Zhou kemin@ece.lsu.edu 578-5533
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History of Feedback Control Manual control: Involving a person. Automatic Control: controlled by a device or machine. Regulator (regulation): hold an output steady against unknown disturbances. Tracking or Servo: track a reference signal. Open-loop control: do not use a measurement to make control decision. Feedback (closed-loop) control: control decision made based on measurement of controlled variables.
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An Example of Feedback Control
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Components of A Simple Feedback Control Process: output to be controlled. Disturbance: degrades performance. Actuator: device that influence the controlled variables. Controller: device (computer) computes the desired control signal. Sensor: devices that measure the controlled variables for feedback. Input shaping filter: converts reference to appropriate form.
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Block Diagram of An Automobile Cruise Control
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Early Feedback Control System: Incubator • Cornelis Drebbel (around 1620)
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Early Feedback Control System: Fly-ball Governor • James Watt (around 1788): for steam engine • G, B. Airy (around 1840): Instability problem • Stability Analysis: James Clerk Maxwell (1868)(Best know for Electromagnetism and Maxwell’s equation.) • E. J. Routh: Adams Prize (1877) for solving stability problem
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Edward John Routh Edward John Routh (1831-1907) was born in Quebec (Canada) and moved to England at the age of three. He attended University College School and then entered University College, London, in 1847 having won a scholarship. There he studied under Augustus De Morgan, whose influence led to him deciding on a career in mathematics. Routh obtained his BA (1849) and MA (1853) in London. Then in 1854, he obtained a BA (Cantab.) (Senior Wrangler) and Smith's prize, followed by an MA in 1857. Routh became the most famous of the Cambridge coaches" of students preparing for the Mathematical Tripos examination of the University of Cambridge in its heyday in the middle of the nineteenth century. Over a period of 22 years from 1862, he coached the Senior Wrangler for every year and in 1854 was himself was a Senior Wrangler, beating James Clerk Maxwell. He published famous advanced treatises which became standard applied mathematics texts, including A Treatise on Stability of a Given State of Motion (1877). His work on dynamic stability won him the Adams Prize in 1877. He was elected to Fellow of the Royal Society on June 6,1872.
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Adolf Hurwitz Adolf Hurwitz (1859{1919) was born in Hildesheim (now Lower Saxony), Germany. Hurwitz entered the University of Munich in 1877. He spent one year there attending lectures by Felix Klein, before spending the academic year 1877-1878 at the University of Berlin where he attended classes by Kummer, Weierstrass and Kronecker, after which he returned to Munich. In October 1880, Felix Klein moved to the University of Leipzig. Hurwitz followed him there, and became a doctoral student under Klein's direction, finishing a dissertation on elliptic modular functions in 1881. Following two years at the
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EE3530-overview - EE3530 Introduction to Control...

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