CHp 10 summary

CHp 10 summary - federal power, and foreign policy. As the...

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APUSH Unit 3 Early Nation Through Era of Good Feelings Chapter 10 Summary The fledgling gov’t faced considerable difficulties and skepticism about its durability, especially since traditional political theory held that large-scale republics were bound to fail. But President Washington brought credibility to the new go’vt, while his cabinet, led by Alexander Hamilton, strengthened its political and economic foundations. The gov’ts first achievements were the Bill of Rights and Hamilton’s financial system. Through effective leadership, Hamilton carried out his program of funding the national debt, assuming state debts, imposing customs and excise taxes, and establishing a Bank of the United States. The bank was the most controversial part of Hamilton’s program because it raised basic constitutional issues. Opposition to the bank from Jefferson and his followers reflected more fundamental political disagreements about republicanism, economics,
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Unformatted text preview: federal power, and foreign policy. As the French Revolution evolved from moderation to radicalism, intensified the ideological division between the pro-French Jeffersonians and the pro-British Hamiltonians. Washington’s Neutrality Proclamation angered Republicans, who wanted America to aid Revolutionary France. Washington’s policy was sorely tested by the British, who routinely violated American neutrality. In order to avoid war, Washington endorsed the conciliatory Jay’s Treaty, further outraging the Republicans and France. After the humiliating XYZ affair, the Untied States came to the brink of war with France, but Adams sacrificed his political popularity and divided his party by negotiating peace. These foreign-policy disagreements embittered domestic politics: Federalists passed the Alien and Sedition Acts, to which Jefferson and Madison responded with the Virginia and Kentucky resolutions....
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This note was uploaded on 02/04/2012 for the course HISTORY 104 taught by Professor Reed during the Spring '11 term at Rutgers.

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