doc_StudyGuideWWI_091655

doc_StudyGuideWWI_091655 - Name: Mr. Bsharah AP US History...

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Unformatted text preview: Name: Mr. Bsharah AP US History Review Study Questions for The Great War True-False Where the statement is true, mark T. Where it is false, mark F, and correct it in the space immedi- ately below. 1. Germany responded to Wilson’s call for “peace without victory” by proposing a tem— porary armistice. 2. Wilson’s promotion of the war as a crusade to end war and spread democracy inspired intense ideological enthusiasm among Americans. . Among Wilson’s Fourteen Points were freedom of the seas, national self-determination for minorities, and an international organization to secure peace. . The Committee on Public Information used an aroused American patriotism more than formal laws and censorship to‘promote the war cause. . The primary targets of prosecution under the Espionage and Sedition Acts were German agents in the United States. . Even during the war mobilization, Americans were extremely reluctant to grant the fed- eral government extensive powers over the economy. . Despite bitter and sometimes violent strikes, American labor made economic and organ- ization gains as a result of World War I. . War-inspired black migration into northern cities, sometimes as strike-breakers, led to major racial riots in 1917—1919. 9. The passage of the Nineteenth Amendment signaled widespread acceptance of women's roles as vital wage earners in the American economy. 10. American troops actually played only a small role in the Allies’ final victory. 11. Before he would negotiate an armistice, President Wilson insisted that the Germans over- throw Kaiser Wilhelm II. __ 12. Wilson’s skillful handling of domestic politics strengthened his hand at the Paris Peace Conference. _ 13. Other Allied leaders forced Wilson to make serious compromises in his Fourteen Points in order to keep the League of Nations in the Treaty of Versailles. __ 14. Republican Senators were willing to accept a treaty and a League of Nations with reser- vations, but Wilson’s unwillingness to compromise sent the whole treaty down to defeat. __ 15. In the election of 1920, Republican Harding supported the League of Nations while Democrat Cox tried to evade the issue. Multiple Choice Select the best answer and write the proper letter in the space provided. 1. The immediate cause of American entry into World War I was a. German support for a possible Mexican invasion of the southwestern United States. b. Germany’s resumption of unrestricted submarine warfare. c. the German defeat of France. d. desire of American munitions makers for large profits. . Wilson aroused the somewhat divided American people to fervent support of the war by a. seizing control of the means of communication and demanding national unity. b. declaring the German people to be immoral Huns and barbarians. c. proclaiming an ideological war to end war and make the world safe for democracy. d. proclaiming the war a religious cmsade. . The capstone “Fourteenth Point” of Wilson’s declaration of war aims called for a. the establishment of parliamentary democracies throughout Europe. b. guarantees of the human rights of minorities and political dissenters. c. an international organization to guarantee collective security. d. freedom of travel without restrictions. ‘ . The purpose of George Creel’s Committee on Public Information was a. to develop information on American wartime industrial production. b. to whip up public support for the war and promote antLGennan propaganda. c. to develop counter-intelligence information on German spies and saboteurs in the United States. d. to recruit volunteers for the armed forces. . The two key laws aimed at enforcing loyalty and suppressing antiwar dissent were a. the War Mobilization Act and the National Defense Act. b. the Selective Service Act and the Public Information Act. c. the Eighteenth Amendment and the Anti-German Language Act. d. the Esnionage Act and the Sedition Act 10. ll. 12. 13. Among the primary victims of the prowar propaganda campaign to enforce loyalty were a. German-Americans and socialists. b. Russian~Americans and communists. c. Mexican-Americans and immigrants. d. African-Americans and feminists. . Among the political changes the war helped bring about was a. a constitutional amendment granting women the right to vote. b. a law granting labor unions the right to strike. c. a constitutional amendment guaranteeing African-Americans the right to travel freely. d. a constitutional amendment prohibiting child labor. . Particularly violent strikes erupted during and after World War I in the a. shipping and railroad industries. b. mining and steel industries. c. textile and clothing manufacturing industries. (1. factories employing women war workers. During World War I, African-American military men served primarily in a. segregated, non-combat support units. b. the navy and the coast guard. c. the most dangerous trenches in northern France. (1. in northern cities where their presence did not threaten the system of segregation. A major difference between the World War I Selective Service Act and the Civil War draft was that z a. in World War I women as well as men were drafted. b. in World War I it was not possible to purchase an exemption or to hire a substitute. c. in World War I draftees were guaranteed that they would not be sent into front-line combat. d. in World War I draftees received the same training as professional soldiers. American soldiers were especially needed in France in the spring of 1918 because the Allied invasion of Germany was faltering short of its goal. Britain had moved many of its soldiers from the western front to Russia. a renewed German invasion was threatening Paris. the Russians had just entered the war on the Germans’ side. 9-957?” Most of the military supplies for General Pershing’s expeditionary force came from America’s European allies. factOries in the United States. captured German materiel. Britain’s colonies in Africa. 999‘.” Wilson blundered when choosing the American peace delegation by failing to a. _ have a set of clear diplomatic plans. b. include any Republicans in the delegation. c. consult with the key Allies, Britain and France. d. become personally involved in the peace process. 14. The European powers and Japan weakened Wilson at the peace conference by refusing to supporthis proposed Leagueof Nations. denouncing the Republicans who were criticizing Wilson at home. rejecting any continuing American involvement in European affairs. forcing him to compromise his ideals on matters of self—determination and punish— ment of Germany. 99.62» 15. Wilson bore considerable responsibility for the failure of the United States to join the League of Nations because a. he finally withdrew his own support for the League. b. he ordered Democratic senators to defeat the pro-League treaty with the Lodge res- ervations. 0. he failed to take the caSe for the League to the American public. d. he demanded that America pay too high a percentage of the cost of the League. Identification! Supply the correct identification for each numbered description. 1. Wilson’s appeal to all the belligerents in January 1917, just before the Germans resumed submarine warfare 2. Message that contained a German proposal to Mexico for an anti-American alliance 3. Wilson’s idealistic statement of American war aims in January 1918 that inspired the Allies and demoralized their enemies 4. American government propaganda agency that aroused zeal for Wilson’s ideals and whipped up hatred for the kaiser 5. Radical antiwar labor union whose members were prosecuted under the Espio— nage and Sedition Act 6. Weak federal agency designed to organize and coordinate U.S. industrial produc- tion for the war effort 7. Constitutional provision endorsed by Wilson as a war measure whose ratification achieved a long-sought goal for American women 8. Treasury Department bond-selling drives that raised about $21 billion to finance the American war effort 9. The nations that dominated the Paris Peace Conference—namely, Britain, France, Italy, and the United States 10. The proposed international body that, to Wilson, constituted the key provision of the Versailles treaty 11. Controversial peace agreement that compromised many of Wilson’s Fourteen Points but retained his League 12. Senatorialcommittee whose chairman used delaying tactics and hostile testimony to develop opposition to Wilson’s treaty and League of Nations 13. A hard core of isolationist senators who bitterly opposed any sort of league; also called the “Battalion of Dealh” 14. Amendments to the proposed Treaty of Versailles, sponsored by Wilson‘s hated senatorial opponent, that attempted to guarantee America’s sovereign rights in rela- tion to the League of Nations 15. Wilson’s belief as to what the presidential election of 1920 would be. if it were presented as a direct popular vote on the League Matching People, Places, and Events Match the person, place, or event in the left column with the proper description in the right column by inserting the correct letter on the blank line. 1. George Creel A. _ Inspirational leader of the Western world in wartime who later stumbled as a peacemaker 2‘ Eugene V‘ Debs B. Senatorial leader of the isolationist “ineconcilables,” who abso- 3. Bernard B amch luter opposcd all American involvement in the League of Nations C. Climactic battle of World War] - 4. Herbert Hoover D. The “tiger” of France, whose drive for security forced Wilson 5 John J Pershing to compromise at Versailles ' ' E. Head of the American prOpaganda agency that mobilized 6. Chateaumhien-y public opinion for World War I F. Folksy Ohio senator whose 1920 presidential victory ended 7- Meuse'Argonne the last hopes for US. participation in the League of Nations 8“ Kaiser G. Hated leader of America’s enemy in World War I Wilhelm H Head of the Food Administration who pioneered successful voluntary mobilization methods Crucial battle of May 1918 in which American troops defended Paris in their first European engagement 9. Wbodrow Wilson I. ‘0‘ “my Cab“ ' Site where state police killed 39 striking miners and their “"186 families in 1917 11. Georges Commander of the Americanexpeditionary force in France Clemenceau Site of Wilson 5 collapse during his last-ditch trip to Win public support for his League of Nations Wilson’s great senatorial antagonist, who succeeded in his goal of keeping America out of the League of Nations Head of the War Industries Board, which attempted to impose some order on US. war production Socialist leader who won nearly a million votes as a presi- dential candidate while in federal prison for antiwar activities 12. William Borah 13. Ludlow, Colorado 14. Pueblo, Colorado 15. Warren G. Harding J. K. L. M. N. 0. Putting Things in Order Put the following events in correct order by numbering them from 1 to 5. Germany’s resumption of submarine warfare forces the United States onto a declaration of war. The Senate’s final defeat of the Versailles treaty and a Republican election victory end Wilson‘t last hopes for American entry into the League of Nations. The United States takes the first hesitant steps toward preparedness in the event of war. The effectiveness of American combat troops in crucial battles helps bring about an Allied vic tory in World War 1. Wilson struggles with other Allied leaders in Paris to hammer out a peace treaty and organ ize the postwar world. Matching Cause and Efi'ect Match the historical cause in the left column withnthe proper effect in the right column by writing the correct letter on the blank line. 10. Cause . Germany’s resumption of unrestricted submarine warfare . Wilson’s Fourteen Points . The wartime atmosphere of emotional patriotism and fear . Women’s labor in wartime factories . The migration of African- Americans to northern cities American troops’ entry into combat in the spring and summer of 1918 . Wilson’s political blunders in the fall of 1918 . The strong diplomatic demands of France, Italy, and Japan Senator Lodge’s tactics of delaying and proposing reser- vations in the Versailles treaty Wilson’s refusal to accept any reservations supported by Lodge Effect Led to major racial violence in Chicago and East St. Louis, Illinois Forced Democrats to vote against a modified treaty and prevented‘ahy American participation in the League of Nations Stopped the final German offensive and turned the tide toward Allied victory Allowed domestic disillusionment and oppo- sition to the treaty and League to build strength Finally pushed the United States into World War I Weakened the president’s position during the peacemaking process Caused harsh attacks on German-Americans and other Americans who opposed the war Lifted Allied and American spirits and demoral- ized Germany and its allies Forced Wilson to compromise his Fourteen Points in order to keep the League as part of the peace treaty Helped pass the Nineteenth Amendment but did not really change society’s emphasis on the maternal role ...
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This note was uploaded on 02/04/2012 for the course HISTORY 104 taught by Professor Reed during the Spring '11 term at Rutgers.

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doc_StudyGuideWWI_091655 - Name: Mr. Bsharah AP US History...

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