The Popular Sovereignty Panacea

The Popular Sovereignty Panacea - The Popular Sovereignty...

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The Popular Sovereignty Panacea (cure for ills or remedy) a. Political Parties i. Each political party enjoyed support in both the North and South ii. Both were content to not bring up the slavery issue iii. Both served as a bond for national unity b. Democratic Candidate for 1848 i. Polk’s health was failing and didn’t want to run for a second term ii. For the election of 1848, the Democrats chose General Lewis Cass, a veteran of the War of 1812 iii. He had a lot of experience (was a Senator), but was pompous (self-inflated) c. General Lewis Cass and Popular Sovereignty i. Came up with the idea of slavery and popular sovereignty. He thought that the sovereign people of a territory, under the principles of the Constitution, should themselves determine the status of slavery ii. The people liked it because it was a democratic principle and tradition iii. Politicians liked it because it was a good compromise between advocates for slavery and advocates against slavery II. Political Triumph for General Taylor a. Whig Candidate for 1848 i. Nominated Zachary Taylor, the Mexican War Hero ii. He didn’t have any political experience and he never voted for president iii. The Whigs emphasized his rugged frontier nature and refused to take a stand on slavery (he was a wealthy resident of LA, lived on a sugar plantation, and owned many slaves)
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This note was uploaded on 02/04/2012 for the course HISTORY 104 taught by Professor Reed during the Spring '11 term at Rutgers.

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The Popular Sovereignty Panacea - The Popular Sovereignty...

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