WDSC100-06 - Shaping the American Landscape Featured...

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Unformatted text preview: Shaping the American Landscape Featured Reference Stephen J. Pyne. 1982. Fire in America: A Cultural History of Wildland and Rural Fire. ...the plants and game upon which American Indians depended thrived in forest mosaics that included a variety of successional stages. Most animals require two or more kinds of vegetation for their habitat, such as openings where they can find food and closed forest for cover. Indians knew this from experience, so they burned forests to enhance the abundance and density of game, as well as plant foods. ... Thus the forests and the Indians sustained one another. Remove the Indians and the forest and wildlife must change. They were inseparable. There is no doubt that American Indians were an integral part of Americas ancient forests. Thomas M. Bonnicksen, America s Ancient Forests, [pp. 224-225] It was as keeper of the flame that man became steward of the land. Stephen J. Pyne, Fire in America [p. 18] Human Mastery of Fire Humans modified the vegetation of Africa, Europe, Asia, and Australia with fire long before their arrival in the Americas Warming Hands by the Stream Eanger Irving Couse Smoke Signal Frederic S. Remington Indians used tremendous quantities of fuel wood Through Sunlit Aspens Ernest Martin Hennings this burning of the Wood to them they count a Benefit, both for destroying of vermin, and keeping downe the Weeds and thickets. Roger Williams Rhode Island The Indian was well aware that fire-disturbed sites provided more food than mature wood vegetation, that seed, berry, and nut growth was stimulated, and that game yields were greatest in areas of constant vegetational succession. Michael Williams, Americans and Their Forests [p. 38] the most important resources of Indian hunter-gatherers are the early succession species commonly found in recently burned areas: bison, moose, deer, elk, rabbits, grouse, grass seeds, legumes, berries, bulbs. However, natural fires are too irregular in occurrence and distribution to be completely relied upon. Henry Lewis, ethnohistorian As quoted by Alston Chase, Playing God in Yellowstone [pp. 93-94] Fire Hunting George Catlin Going for the Big Bull Mort Kunstler Pleistocene people,...
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WDSC100-06 - Shaping the American Landscape Featured...

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