WDSC100-10 - A Walk Through Williamsburg Capital of...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–16. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
A Walk Through Williamsburg
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
• Capital of Virginia  from 1699 to 1780 • Restoration began in  1926 • John D. Rockefeller,  Jr. • A view of how  Americans lived in  1774
Background image of page 2
“Living History”
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 4
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Palace of  the Royal  Governor was  where the  power and  wealth of the  British Empire  was on display  to the people of  Virginia.
Background image of page 6
A walk through Williamsburg reveals  that America was built with wood
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Estimated 3.4 million miles of fence  existed in America in 1850
Background image of page 8
Virginia, Zigzag, or Snake Fence
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Plank Fences
Background image of page 10
Post and Rail Fence
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
“As early as 1750 Peter Kalm made the dire  prediction that the forest in Pennsylvania  would last only another 40 to 50 years if  the zigzag fence continued to be built.” Michael Williams, Americans and Their Forests  (p. 75)
Background image of page 12
Fuel
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
• Fuel was readily available  and the natural byproduct of  clearing land • Cutting, splitting, and  gathering firewood was labor  intensive.   • Farmers typically cut wood  in the winter when other  farm work could not be  done.   • In towns and cities, firewood  was brought in from the  countryside by farmers or  wood dealers Silversmith Shop
Background image of page 14
cut for fuel – avoiding  knotty or twisted stems. • Hardwoods are typically  denser than softwoods,  producing more heat and  burning longer. • Softwoods also produce 
Background image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 16
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/04/2012 for the course HISTORY 104 taught by Professor Reed during the Spring '11 term at Rutgers.

Page1 / 52

WDSC100-10 - A Walk Through Williamsburg Capital of...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 16. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online