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WDSC100-12 - The Innovation of Light Frame Construction...

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The Innovation of Light Frame Construction
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America: 1790, 1832, and 1861 1790 16 States 3,894,000 people 1832 24 States 12,786,000 people 1861 34 States 31,184,000 people
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Forces Influencing American Society in the early 19 th century: Population 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 1790 1800 1810 1820 1830 1840 1850 1860 Population in Millions
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Westward Expansion
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The Agrarian Society Farms had replaced Indian clearings and forests Forests near population centers had been cut over
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“The quickened rate of cutting for the 29 years between 1839 and 1859 was an obvious feature of the transition that was occurring in the lumber industry as the traditional processes and patterns that existed for at least the last two centuries were being replaced by new ones, which were to result in geographical and historical movements of far-reaching significance.” Michael Williams, Americans and Their Forests (p. 160)
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Shifting Location of Lumber Production Williams, p. 162
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“Early in the 19 th century, New York surpassed Maine in lumbering; later Pennsylvania became the leading state. By 1876 Michigan was by far the most productive state…. Pennsylvania was second in production, followed by Wisconsin and New York.” Youngquist and Fleischer, Wood in American Life (p. 72)
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“The Lake States remained the center of the lumber industry until the early 20 th century, when their magnificent stands of virgin white pine were finally exhausted.” Youngquist and Fleischer, Wood in American Life (p. 72)
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“Both lumbermen and settlers saw no reason for the government to deny them the timber; to them it was obvious that the American forests were inexhaustible. For the government to withhold acres of timber that might be put to good use made no sense to them….
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