10.1.1.115.2055

10.1.1.115.2055 - Modelling, Simulation and Controller...

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0 Modelling, Simulation and Controller Design for Mechatronic Systems with 20-sim 3.0 Job van Amerongen Cornelis J. Drebbel Research Institute for Systems Engineering and Control Laboratory, Electrical Engineering Department, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, Netherlands e-mail: J.vanAmerongen@el.utwente.nl, http://www.el.utwente.nl/amn
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1 Modelling, Simulation and Controller Design for Mechatronic Systems with 20-sim 3.0 Job van Amerongen Cornelis J. Drebbel Research Institute for Systems Engineering and Control Laboratory, Electrical Engineering Department, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, Netherlands e-mail: J.vanAmerongen@el.utwente.nl, http://www.el.utwente.nl/amn Abstract: This paper discusses the use of the modelling and simulation program 20-sim for the analysis and design of mechatronic systems. Control engineers traditionally use transfer functions, block diagrams or state space descriptions. In mechatronics, where a controlled system as a whole has to be designed, it is advantageous that model parameters are directly related to physical components. In addition it is desired that models be reusable. Block- diagram-based simulation packages hardly support these features. 20-sim allows input of models in the form of equations, block diagrams, bond graphs and iconic diagrams. This will be illustrated by means of the design of a system that is representative for many mechatronic systems. Keywords: mechatronics, modeling, simulation, controller design, CACSD 1 Introduction Simulation is an important tool to evaluate the design of (control) systems. Originally computer simulations required conventional programming. One of the early programs especially designed for simulation was THTSIM (later TUTSIM), developed by the University of Twente in the 1970’s. Tools to enter block diagrams graphically became available in programs as EASY5 (1976), Simulink (1991) and Vissim (1990). Programs that support modelling of physical systems in particular domains are PSPICE (electronic networks), ADAMS (mechanical systems) and SpeedUp (chemical processes). Recently also programs that allow physical modelling in various physical domains became available. They use an object-oriented approach that allows hierarchical modelling and reuse of models. The order of computation is only fixed after combining the sub systems. Examples of these programs are 20-sim (1995), originally known as CAMAS (1990) [15] and Dymola (1993). This paper will illustrate some new features of version 3.0 of 20-sim (pronounce Twente Sim). 20-sim supports object-oriented modelling: each object is determined by equations and power and signal ports to and from the outside world [12]. Other realisations of an object can contain different or more detailed descriptions as long as the interface (number and type of ports) is identical. This allows top-down modelling as well as bottom-up modelling. Modelling can start by a simple interconnection of (empty) sub models. Later they can be filled with realistic descriptions with various degrees of complexity (models can be polymorphic [16]). Sub models can be
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10.1.1.115.2055 - Modelling, Simulation and Controller...

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