30_lecture - Chapter 30 Microbial Interactions 1 an...

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 30 Microbial Interactions 1 an association of two or more different species of organisms H. A. deBary, 1879 2 Symbiosis ectosymbiont organism located on surface of another organism (usually larger) endosymbiont organism located within another organism symbiont physical contact between dissimilar organisms of similar size 3 Microbial Interactions consortium hosts that have more than one associated symbiont relationships can be intermittent and cyclic or permanent types of interactions include mutualism, cooperation, predation, commensalism, parasitism, amensalism, and competition 4 Microbial Interactions 5 Figure 30.1 some reciprocal benefit to both partners relationship with some degree of obligation often partners cannot live separately mutualist and host are dependent on each other 6 Mutualism endosymbiotic microbe provides needed vitamins and amino acids insect host provides secure habitat and nutrients e.g., insect- Wolbachia interactions 7 Microorganism-Insect Mutualisms tube worm-bacterial relationships exist thousands of meters below ocean surface chemolithotrophic bacterial endosymbionts live within specialized organ (trophosome) of host tube worm fix CO2 with electrons provided by H2S 8 Sulfide-Based Mutualisms 9 Figure 30.5 along with commensalism is a positive, but not obligate, form of symbiosis which involves syntrophic relationships benefits both organisms in relationship differs from mutualism because cooperative relationship is not obligatory 10 Cooperation 11 Figure 30.8 type of commensalism whereby growth of one organism depends on or is improved by growth factors, nutrients, or substrates provided by another organism growing nearby also called crossfeeding or satellite phenomenon 12 Syntrophism one organism benefits and the other is neither harmed nor helped commensal organism that benefits often syntrophic can also involve modification of environment by one organism, making it more suited for another organism 13 Commensalism nitrification NH3fi NO2 fi NO3 carried out by two different bacteria e.g., Nitrosomonas carries out first step e.g., Nitrobacter carries out second step (i.e., it benefits from its association with Nitrosomonas ) 14 Examples of Commensalism...
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30_lecture - Chapter 30 Microbial Interactions 1 an...

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