CR chap 3b - KUT‘GERS Artifacts - Consider how artifacts...

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Unformatted text preview: KUT‘GERS Artifacts - Consider how artifacts (clothes, jewelry, cars, electronic equipment, etc.) signal meaning. What possessions are considered "Status symbols“ on our campus What possessions, modes of dress, etc. create a negative impression? Think back to middle school. What artifacts did most kids want? Why is the need to wear brand names and possess certain objects so important at that age? ’ ‘RUTGERS : 9 Artifacts 0 Physical appearance —- Different physical beauty ' Amos; firm and mm — Color, style of hair, body shape, jewelry, clothing, etc. ‘Cltfihincj \nm Mm PDWU “to ‘inf‘twunca - The newest laptop and/or cell phone, a luxury car, name brand goods, etc. Cultural meanings of color - Red — China ' signifies prosperity & rebirth ‘ Used for festive and joyous occasions; celebration - Good luck — France & United Kingdom - Signifies masculinity — Korea - Used red ink only to write a person’s name at the time of death (Devito, 2005) KUTGERS‘ Different culture, different meanings ° Greetings nundbhuwzmtxcs tu-m . Eye contact 0 Body Space 0 Touch RUTGERS Chronemics - Interpreting messages associated with time - mmghrm‘m time (M-time) _'l\‘mg is yu% Smfigrdw — Time schedule & appointments — Can be Mafia — North America and Northern Europe - %\%gg\nrbn\g time (P-time) — Personal involvement — strong tendency to build lifetime relationships — Latin America and the Middle East mJTGERS " Olfactics - Smell communication — For a relaxing message, a few drops of lavender oil has been often used. — Smell of Jasmine seem to increase alertness in the afternoon. - Smell of rose oil seems to reduce blood pressure. - Smell of chocolate seems to produce a sense of relaxation. - Important messages ~ PMTQUN‘M WSSQCaQS - Mbmonfl mum - IdWhtcmorx ' swam ' wRUTGERS Haptics - Touch (tactile) communication ° ngt SXSWYMVS, {m gm Sbmmggn‘igg‘fibn — including handshakes, holding hands, kissing (cheek, hand), high fives, brushing an arm. - Contexts & Functions of touch — Age, gender mJTGERS V "Afew nonverbal behaviors that can get I you into trouble - Tapping your two index fingers together — An invitation to sleep together in Egypt - Pointing with the index finger — impolite in many Middle Eastern countries - Pointing at someone with your index and third fingers — A wish that evil fall on the person in some African countries - Resting your feet on a table or chair — Insulting in some Middle Eastern countries The ‘OK’ gesture — In France: nothing or zero — in Japan: money ’ :méas Expectancy Violations Theory dv i M. human beam/rd, ° EX ectancies .. Whigbh$§mmbers unfiuvmkd wpfiscflbed m Ck CQHVUSCXHDn _ws+l« mothr puma - Assumptions of EVT — Expectancies drive human interaction. — Expectancies for human behavior are learned. — People make predictions about nonverbal behavior. ,RUTQERS .. Assumptions of EVT (1) Expectancies drive human interaction. — Individual communicator factors ” — Relational factors EfiszOJ‘UQ3 — Context factors — Pre-interactional expectations — lnteractional expectations KUTGERS Assumptions of EVT (2) Expectancies for human behavior are learned. - From “Mums individuals A ° Fonda» YWQI m 2.» how v t std—e C quwxmj (3) People ma e predictions about nonverbal NW, behavior. ~Nonvulodl mover 04kg: .tN QOrwt/r's (mi on . A—Prr ct L’h‘ W, MS > bk. on r§\\rs>> (\dk e Ritual upmumm, ‘mcxnnz‘r's OHM/Jr “WK (DOW “Hwy, ,m‘th \2 hoore “ @TGERS Expectancy Violations Theory —cont’d - Arousal dgmgmm "idiom {XEQMCK‘WQAB MUN) g filming arousal - ental awareness of violations from expectations — Elwin 3g! arousal - Bodily changes as a result of deviations from expectations N‘RUTGEliS Expectancy Violations Theory —cont’d - Threat threshold — Wusomhmr - Violation valence JPOSng gr mg gs: mm of an unexpected behavior - Reward valence — Sum of the positive and negative characteristics of a person and the potential for the person to carry out rewards or punishments RUTCERS. a Cognitive Valence Theory - Perception — whether or not the behavioral violation is actually perceived by the other person - Physiological arousal — High: unpleasant, aversive -) immediacy withdrawal — Moderate: interest, excitement, activation — Lowz: no reciprocity or compensation - Cognitive Schemas ...
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This note was uploaded on 02/04/2012 for the course COMM REL 201 taught by Professor Youn during the Spring '12 term at Rutgers.

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CR chap 3b - KUT‘GERS Artifacts - Consider how artifacts...

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