Ch20 - Q19.1a Capacitor initially charged. Which graph...

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Q19.1a Capacitor initially charged. Which graph shows CURRENT vs TIME while DISCHARGING?
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Q19.1b Capacitor initially charged (left plate negative) When circuit is connected: 1) Charge on the plates stays constant. 2) Left plate gets less negative. 3) Left plate gets more negative.
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Q19.1c Which graph shows CURRENT vs TIME while CHARGING? Capacitor initially uncharged.
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Q19.1d Capacitor initially uncharged. When circuit is connected: 1) Electrons jump across the gap between the plates. 2) Electrons pile up on the left plate. 3) Electrons pile up on the right plate.
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Q19.1e Capacitor initially uncharged. Which graph shows MAGNITUDE of CHARGE on RIGHT PLATE vs. time while charging?
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Q19.1f Capacitor initially uncharged. Which graph shows the magnitude of the FRINGE FIELD OF THE CAPACITOR at location A while CHARGING?
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Q19.1g Capacitor initially uncharged. Which graph shows the magnitude of the NET FIELD at location A while CHARGING?
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Q19.5a Capacitors initially uncharged. ε = R s A Q E fringe 2 0 After 0.01 s of charging: 1) The fringe field of each capacitor is the same 2) The smaller capacitor (#1) has a larger fringe field 3) The larger capacitor (#2) has a larger fringe field
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Q19.11a What is the conductivity of copper? Copper has 8e28 electrons/m 3 and the mobility is 4.5e-3 m/s / N/C. 1) 2.84e12 Am -2 /(V/m) 2) 3.6e26 Am -2 /(V/m) 3) 5.76e7 Am -2 /(V/m) 4) 1.21e6 Am -2 /(V/m)
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Q19.11b How much higher is the conductivity of copper than that of nichrome? n copper = 8.0e28 electrons/m 3 n nichrome = 9.0e28 electrons/m 3 u copper = 4.5e-3 m/s / N/C u nichrome = 7e-5 m/s / N/C 1) σ copper = 57 σ nichrome 2) σ copper = 1.75e-2 σ nichrome 3) σ copper = 72 σ nichrome 4) σ copper = 100 σ nichrome
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Q19.11c Many commercial resistors are made of carbon, which has a very low conductivity, σ carbon = 3e4 Am -2 /(V/m). A 5 mm long carbon resistor with a
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This note was uploaded on 02/04/2012 for the course PHY 303L taught by Professor Turner during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas.

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Ch20 - Q19.1a Capacitor initially charged. Which graph...

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