art1000 - ART 100 Journal#1 Visual Analysis of Funerary...

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Unformatted text preview: ART 100 October 22, 2009 Journal #1: Visual Analysis of Funerary Mask In early history, people started sculpting images and portraits in which defined each time period, culture, religion, and style. In class, we had viewed many works of art through Ancient Near East, Egyptian Art, Greeks and so far into Roman Art. Each work held a significant importance in which still represents its symbols through modern day art. The work I decided to analyze was the Funerary Mask, from Grave Circle A. The sculpture was originally gold and from the Mycenae Greece ca. 1600-1500BCE. This sculpture was tended to show the ideal shape of a normal human face structure. The gold represented the rich and in fact the "bearded man" to be represented in this time period. Although the figure did not represent an important God or leader, the boldness and the elaborate beards showed its significance as an older man who can be king. The artist who was sculpting this work of art did not very focus on the real aspects of a human figure. The lines of symmetry that I notice are the fact that his checks are not in proportion. Also, his ears are not balanced and are not lined up with each other. His nose shows a line of symmetry that separates the two parts of the figure. Overall the sculpture does not look in order and these specific lines show the separation. Some of the compositional lines break through the whole sculpture by the wrinkles on his face. They also evenly spread out among his face, vertically aligning the nose and horizontally across the ears. The visual element of the sculpture tends to be a bright tone as a whole. The face seems very off in terms of realism. Although the man shows the perfect human face, the nose, the eyes, ears, and skin, seems much idealized. The skin of the face is almost as if it was wrinkled and crumbled if it were portrayed in a paper image. The beard is very detailed and tends to be almost fake looking as oppose to a beard of a real human figure. The ear has its natural look of a human ear, yet the lines and structure is not fully complete. Although there are many insights to looking idealized, it does have a sense of realism in some ways. As oppose to the Egyptian sculptures, this man was portrayed as very old. This brings up the fact that they were becoming a bit modern and were attempting for change. The gold mask is often referred to as a repoussé. Its original height is one foot long. Although many gold sculptures have been sculpted, this was the first attempt to structure into a life-sized portrait in the Greece time period. Zabebah Mohamed ART 100 November1, 2009 Journal #2: Dialogue Architect for Pantheon (Rome Italy 118-125ce.) = AUSTIN (Toulouse, France, ca. 1070-1120) = JAQUE Austin: Even thought you are from a different time period, I think your designs are rather different in terms of architectural designs.different in terms of architectural designs....
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art1000 - ART 100 Journal#1 Visual Analysis of Funerary...

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