history term paperrrr

history term paperrrr - AFA History 263 The Civil rights...

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AFA History 263 The Civil rights and African American Women Leaders May 2 2011 Though history women, particularly African-Americans, were pivotal in the critical battles for racial equality, Rosa Parks’ death highlights the fact that she was one of the very few
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female civil rights figures who are widely known. Most women in the movement played background roles; either by choice or due to bias, since being a woman of color meant facing both racism and sexism. But before and after Rosa Parks came very well known civil rights leaders, and these leaders dedicated their lives to ending slavery, segregation, and unfair treatment. Ida B. Wells was one of the early leaders of the civil rights movement. She documented the extent of lynching in the United States, and was also active in the women's rights movement and the women's suffrage movement. Harriet Tubman was another slave who worked to free slaves. She ran away because she was afraid of being shipped further south where slaves were treated very badly. Learn more about her escape and how she went on to help many others escape to freedom. Finally, Sojourner Truth was also a slave, but she won her freedom by running away. After she was free, she preached to others about ending slavery and fought for free Blacks and women to be treated as equals with Whites and men. The thing that stands out about Ms. Ida B. Wells is that she was a one man or should I say one woman wrecking crew when it came to crusading journalism, especially when it came to equal rights, racism. Wells was born in Mississippi in 1862 to two slave parents. She was the oldest of her seven siblings. At the time that Wells was born Abraham Lincoln had just passed the Emancipation Proclamation. The proclamation declared, "That all persons held as slaves within the rebellious states are, and henceforward shall be free". So when she was growing up although the south was still very racist, she and her siblings were able to go to school. It was very important to Wells' parents that their children got an education. That is where her foundation for being a journalist began. Tragedy struck in 1878 when the yellow fever epidemic killed her parents and her youngest sibling. At age sixteen Wells became responsible for her younger
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siblings. She took a job as a teacher and did other jobs on the weekends to support herself and her brothers and sisters. Wells attended Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee. One day while taking a train to school, she was told by the conductor to move to the back of the train to a smoking car. She would not move and as a result of him trying to move her she bit him. The conductor eventually got help and moved her to the back of the train. At the next stop she got off the train and went back to Memphis. She filed a lawsuit against the railroad company. She ended up winning her case in court and was given a five hundred dollar settlement, but the Tennessee Supreme Court overturned the decision claiming that her intension was to cause trouble on the train. These
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history term paperrrr - AFA History 263 The Civil rights...

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