unit 10 - SU 2 - * An interconnected world TOPIC PREVIEW [I...

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Unformatted text preview: * An interconnected world TOPIC PREVIEW [I Read each statement describing a result of globalization. In your opinion, is it a positive result, a negative result, or both? Explain your answers. 1. l 2. People In over 200 countries around I Much of the clothing sold in North . the world drink Coca‘Cola. ' America is made in developing ‘ ‘ countries where labor is much cheaper. _ ,_‘H_ _7 ___—__’J 3 f .7 -7 r I 4- _ 7 —J . l The introduction of modernized i More and more people are learning farming techniques has led to an abandonment of traditional farming languages such as English. French. methods and greater food production and Spanish rather than local. . and speaking widespread official in some developing countries. indigenous languages. Read the quotation about globalization. Do you agree that globalization can be both good and bad? Explain your answer and give examples. "Globalization is much like fire. Fire itself is neither good nor bad. Used properly. it can cook food. sterilize equipment, form iron, and heat our homes. Used carelessly, fire can destroy lives, towns. and forests in an instant.” ——Keith Porter. U.S.journa|lst 114 LESSON 1 a Read the article. Circle the phrasal verbs. ith restaurants in l l9 countries. it's clear that Mcl.)onald‘s has become a global brand. And while there are those who criticize the company‘s expansion and cultural influence. others explain that individual restaurants. most ol’ which are locally owned. modify their menus tor:cater if) local diets and {uer ‘ restaurants around the “orltl. and you'll likely come across a surprising number of (heck out the menus in McDonald's unfamiliar choices. For example. you can pick up a McFelal’el in Egypt. seaweed burgers in Japan, and rabbit in France. Enter a McDonald's in Italy. and you'll find out that you can order an espresst’). Wondering about the McAloo 'likki Burger on the McDonald's menu in India? Try it out—but don’t count on it including any beef. In India. you'll have to go without a a McDonald's restaurant in Rlyd(ll1,SdLl(ll Arabia McDonald's signature hamburger. as the chain‘s restaurants in that country don‘t serve beef. [I What About You? What’s your opinion of large multinational companies like McDonald’s? Do you believe that they add to or take away from local cultures and traditions? Explain your answer. a Complete the conversations. Circle the correct phrase in each pair. If both phrases are correct, circle them both. Conversation 1 Jack: Ben: This project isn't coming out the way that I imagined it at all. I think we should (1. start it over / start over it). I disagree. Now that we've started, I think we need to (2. see the project through / see through the project). I mean, people are (3. counting us on / counting on us) to finish it before the deadline. Conversation 2 Amy: Jason: Amy: Jason: We need a way to tell people about our organization. Well, one idea is to (4. hand out papers I hand papers out) with our name and some information about us. No, people just (5. throw away papers / throw papers away). How about pencils? We could get a bunch of pencils made with our name and website on them. That’s a good idea. Then people would be reminded of us each time they (6. pick the pencil up / pick up the pencil). Let's (7. check out prices I check prices out) for 1,000 pencils. An interconnected world 1 ‘l 5 Conversation 3 Iris: You know, I’m really interested in (a. taking up knitting / taking knitting up). Mary: Really? You should do it. But don't (9. put it off / put off it). Winter will be here before you know it, and it’d be great to make some hats, gloves, and scarves. Iris: You're right. I'd better start looking for a place that offers classes. Is there any chance i can (10. talk into you / talk you into) taking them with me? Mary: Actually. that sounds like fun. Iris: All right. I’ll let you know if I (11. come anything across / come across anything). Mary: Sounds good. Hooray for . . . Bollywood? llieuosipoplihrfilmsintheworldilonoiadmflywmefmmllollywood. Althoiigllfilmsfrom lheUnhedSiaesmmainnnpopduwoddwideJklndianfilmmkinginfiumbwnas Bollywood.nowservesasthepiiinansonmofentcmimeuiformonlhnlnlioithewurld's populdioa. Whilefloflywoodrdeasesmavmoflmmperywjoflywoodispum outalmostllireetimesasmany: lZOOmovicspuyear.AcconlinglooneBBCpollllIemsi - fmnadwhthewoddisn'lmAmaimfihnstarJdBoflywwdkgndAnflnthachdnm 'ndiflnfilmw Amitobh Bodiehon LESSON 2 a Complete each paragraph. Circle the correct phrasal verb in each pair. 1. Based on the following fact. many people say that it's time to bring about / put up with changes in global education: It would cost $8 billion to provide basic education to every child in the world. 'l‘here's no reason why any child should have to go without / lay off an education. 2. Scientists now say that rising ocean temperatures due to global warming will carry out / wipe out plankton. the microscopic plants upon which the ocean's food chains are based. lf plans are not put up with I carried out to stop global warming. all marine life is at risk ofextinetion. 3. Cholera is an infection of the large intestine. When a person comes down with I comes up with the disease, the results can include rapid dehydration and even death. The current cholera epidemic in Africa has lasted for more than 30 years. 4. In the past several years. factory workers in this country have had to put up with / bring about declining wages. higher costs for medical benefits. and longer working hours. Now these workers face a new challenge—companies are carrying out / laying off employees and moving their factories to less— developed countries where labor is much cheaper. 116 UNIT 10 Complete the chart. Make a list of issues that affect the world today. Identify possible problems that these issues could create, and suggest possible solutions. Then answer the questions. World issues Possible negative results Possible solutions .. ti'ifl" ‘va’.'l’.""l"l_'4 "lil'iQ 0' ,,.Lir“ y'nn‘ipcrofures l coma: up w'yl‘n nCw angry, sources To rlzpl'gc; tit/.35., that cause globu” warmma l wxpr 31.‘ m'JfinL-i lite 1. What global issues are you most concerned about? Why? 2. What global issues are you least concerned about? Why? LESSON 3 a Complete the sentences with the words and phrases from the box. employment rate import investment unemployment rate export income standard of living wages 1. The Swedish people enjoy a high . Sweden is among the top 10 richest countries in the world. Literacy rates are close to 100 percent and the life expectancy is high. 2. Brazil is the world’s largest producer of coffee, which is an important for the country. 3. When Babacar first moved to Dakar, he got work in a grocery store earning of less than $1 per day. Through hard work, Babacar saved enough money to open his own business. His yearly is now more than $100,000 per year. 4. As new businesses open and hire more workers, the of the city goes up. 5. Mr. Edwards put some of his savings into a very small company over 20 years ago. Since that time, the company has become very successful, and Mr. Edwards’s has made him a lot of money. 6. Like many countries, Greece depends heavily on oil from other countries. In fact, oil is the country's largest 7. When a country's starts to rise, it's usually a sign of a weak economy. An interconnected world 1 1 7 a Read the article. 118 Sweatshops J“ One of the most publicized results of globalization in recent years has been the transfer of well-paid manufacturing jobs from developed countries to less-developed ones. where workers can be paid much less and goods are significantly cheaper to produce. Critics of this trend have been vocal. In the developed countries where manufacturing jobs are disappearing. labor protesters claim that the resulting rise in the unemployment rate is hurting the national economy. Critics also point out that when the jobs move to developing countries. the working conditions at many facilities in developing countries are far below the accepted standards in developed countries. At these facilities. commonly known as "sweatshops." employees work long hours. often in dangerous conditions. for low pay. Without government laws againSt child labor. some workers are as young as five years old. UNIT 10 The Price of Development? A typical Western response to sweatshops has been to boycott. or refuse to buy. any imports made under these conditions. Surprisingly. however. opinion polls show that most people in developing countries view these sweatshop jobs positively. Although sweatshop workers in developing nations hope for better wages and working conditions. they don't want consumers in developed nations to protest the situation by refusing to buy the products they make. These boycotts could lead to the closing of factories and employees losing their jobs. Many workers feel that working under these conditions is better than having no job at all. Moreover. some experts point to statistics showing that sweatshop labor has had a positive economic impact on some developing countries. Average incomes for sweatshop workers are now 5 times what they were less than 20 years ago. The working conditions at some factories have improved. as each company tries to attract the best workers. Decreasing infant mortality rates and rising levels of education are indications of an increased standard of living. While the pros and cons of sweatshop labor continue to be debated. one fact remains clear—the world economy is rapidly changing into one free-flowing global market. The challenge will be to come up with a way to make globalization work for the benefit of everyone. Now read each statement. Check tru_e or f_al_se, according to the information in the article. 1. The article describes workers moving from developing countries —* m to developed countries in search of jobs. The number of manufacturing jobs in developed countries is rising. Factories with poor working conditions are known as "sweatshops." .U‘PWN Products that are made by low-paid workers are commonly known The article presents arguments both for and against sweatshop labor. m — as "imports." — 6. Some workers in developing countries have decided to stop buying — — products made in sweatshops. 7. Statistics Show that wages for sweatshop workers in some countries are rising. WV] and comfort in some developing countries 3 8. Statistics suggest that sweatshop jobs have increased the level of wealth j 3 9. The article recommends that the globalization of the world economy be stopped. |—] W What About You? Do you know where the things you buy are made? Look at the labels of some things you own. List each item and its country of origin below. Then answer the questions. Country of origin 1. Do you think it’s important to buy products that are made in your own country, rather than to buy goods imported from other countries? Explain your answer. 2. Do you think that boycotts are effective at changing bad company practices? Have you ever participated in a product boycott yourself? An interconnected world 1 1 9 LESSON 4 In Read the people's opinions on language and international communication. Then answer the questions in your own way. 1. "I don’t see why we need to have an 'international’ language. That’s what translators are for." — Menes Beshay, Egypt 2. "I think an international language is a good idea, but I think it should be a created language, like Esperanto, so that no one has the advantage of it being their native tongue." — Callia Xenos, Greece 3. "Sure, it makes sense to have an international language, but why not make it something other than English? I mean, ‘ Mandarin Chinese has nearly three times as many native speakers as English. Why don’t we learn that instead?" — Alfredo Vivas, Chile 4. “English is the best choice for an international language because it’s already been established as the language of business and science. More websites are in English than in any other language, and it's the most popular second language in the world to learn." — DonarGorzowski, Poland 1. Which of the opinions above most closely matches y0ur own? 2. Do you think an international language is a good idea? Why or why not? 3. In your opinion, is English a good choice for an international language? Why or why not? 120 UNIT 10 m Read the dictionary definitions. Then use the key to answer the questions. com-pe-tence “’kuntpotans also lin-gua Iran-ca _lltjg“:0 'frtenko It. [CI a competency '-patnn\i It. 1 [U] the language used between people whose ability and skill to do what is needed: main languages are different: Swahili is Players are judged by their mmpetenre on the lingua franca of East Africa. thefleld. 2 [U] a special area of knowledge: It is not within my competence to make such judgments. 3 [Cl FORMAL a skill needed to do a particular job—compare lN('0.\lPETl-‘.N(‘l~2 promui-nence “promotions It. 1 [U] the fact of being important and well known: The case gained prominence (=became well known) because of the brutal nature of the murders. i come/ rise to he-gomco-ny lln'dscmani. -'ge-. prominence Brubeck rose to prominence 'hcd3o,moimi/ n. [Ul a situation in which as a jazz pianist in the 19503. 2 [C] one state or country controls others FORMAL a part or place that is higher or larger than what is around it ln-dlg-oonous ztn'dtdsonns/ adj. 1 indigenous people. customs. cultures. etc. are the people. customs etc. that have always been in a place. before other KEY people or customs arrived 2 indigenous animals. plants. etc. haVe always lived or . Grammar Codes grown naturally in the place where they [Cl countabw pans or speech are. as opposed to others that were [U] uncountable adj, adjective brought there: [+ to] Red foxes are I” ,mransmve adu, adverb indigenous to the East and Midwest parts In transmve n. noun “1 "1" L5: [LT] intransitive l‘- Verb or transitive Excerpted from Longman Advanced American Dictionary (0 2005 1. Which three words have multiple meanings? 2. How many of the dictionary words are nouns? 3. Which entry contains an antonym (opposite)? 4. Which two words can be both countable and uncountable? Esperanto is a created language, constructed in the l8705 l8805 by Dr. Ludovit‘ Lazarus Zamenltof of Poland. Zamcnltof wanted to Come up m'th a new language that was relatiwa easy to learn. He hoped that the language would he used internationally as a tool for communication and that it would help to promote global peace and understanding. Although Esperanto has no ollit'ial status in any ronntty there are currently ‘2 ntillion speakers ol' the language around the \\(tl‘l(l. An interconnected world 1 21 Read the article. Seeking a global language Due to its far-reaching effects and prominence in many parts of the globe, English is now commonly referred to as an intemational or global language. It is an official language in 52 countries and has lingua franca status in many others. It is the most widely learned foreign language worldwide. It has been estimated that between 20 and 33 percent of the world's population understand and speak English with some level of competence. it has become the most useful language to leam for intemational travel and business. It is the official language for aircraft and airport communication and is often the chosen language educated people) and those who don't. There is of intemational diplomacy. also some concem that as English is used more Arguments have been made for and against and more globally, it might lead to a cultural the adoption of English as a global language. hegemony of countries where English is spoken Proponents point out that a global language can as a native language. An additional concern lead to better intemational communication and about the spread of English is that indigenous an easier exchange of information (for example, languages spoken by smaller groups of people on the lntemet). On the other hand, the may die out. Of course, some of these arguments existence of one global language can increase the would be true for any global language (exc‘ept divide between those who know it (often better— for a created one), not just English. Now read each statement. Check true or false, according to the information in the article. true false 1. The main topic of the article is a discussion of the pros and cons of [:J [:1 learning foreign languages. 2. English is often described as a global language because it is so well known throughout the world. 3. English is often used between two people whose first language is not English—for example, a French person speaking to a Chinese person. 4. One argument against using English as a global language is that it’s very difficult to learn—very few people achieve a high level of competence. 5. Some people are concerned that the use of English as a global language w0uld give English-speaking countries too much power. 6. There is a concern that if English is adopted as a global language, people may stop using less common local languages. EEEEEE EEEEEE 7. The article concludes that English is the best choice for a global language. 122 UNIT 10 Grammar Booster u Underline the phrasal verbs in each sentence. Then write I if the sentence has a transitive meaning or i if it has an intransitive meaning. 1. It's a formal event, so everyone should dress up. After hearing the news, the committee called off the celebration. When I think back on those times, they seem like so long ago. The girl grew up in a small fishing village in the north. It’s incredibly rude to cut someone off when they’re speaking. Please look your essay over before you send it to your teacher. He agreed to go along with the story, but he wasn't happy about it. Please, sit down and make yourself comfortable. PFNF‘P'PP’N The conference was a little boring, but we came away with some good information. B Read each sentence. Write I if the sentence has a transitive meaning or! if it has an intransitive meaning. Then match each definition to the way the phrasal verb is used in each sentence. 1. I You’re being ridiculous. Stop carrying on like that! - M, continue 2. T We've carried on many of the traditions from when '/ A“ » , behave in a smy way we were children. 3. We blew up balloons to decorate the room for the party. SUddenly become very angry 4. A devoted Tigers fan, John blew up when he heard they had lost the game. fill with air 5. I don’t want to fight anymore. Let's make up. end an argument 6. My grandfather used to make up stories that even the create adults loved to hear. 7. Can you turn up the volume on the TV? I can’t hear it. appear 8. After looking everywhere for my keys, they finally turned raise, increase up under the couch. Underline the phrasal verbs in each sentence. Then write A ifthe sentence is active or E if it is passive. 1. The memo was thrown out because we thought it was trash. Someone used up all the hot water before I could take a shower. The poster had to be done over again because the first one was a disaster. That group of kids always leaves Ginny out when they play games. 2 3 4. They passed out coupons and prizes at the door. 5 6 The passengers on the bus were let off at the corner. 7 The application had been filled out with a blue pen. An interconnected world 1 2 3 Writing: Write a letter to the editor Writing a letter to the editor of a newspaper or magazine is one way to express your opinion on issues that concern you. Many publications regularly include a special section for letters they receive from their readers. Step 1. Prewriting. Generating ideas. 0 Think about three situations in your city or country that you're concerned about. People often write about situations that are related to current news topics. Consider laws, governmental policies, and social and economic situations that you know of. 0 List the situations and write possible solutions. A letter to the editor often includes a "call to action" in which the writer of the letter urges readers to do something specific to support his or her cause. Step 2. Writing. Choose one of the situations to write about. Decide which publication to send your letter to. Find the address to which you should send your letter. (A publication’s specific instructions for submitting a letter to the editor are usually at the bottom of the publication’s page where the letters appear.) On a separate sheet of paper, write a letter to the editor of your chosen publication. Your letter should clearly state your position in relation to the situation. Include your solution and/or call to action. Follow the f0rmat in the writing model on page 120 of the Student’s Book. Step 3. Self-Check. Does the letter follow the format for addresses and dates? Does the letter start with a salutation and end with a complimentary close? Does the letter have an opening and a conclusion? Did you explain the problem in detail? EDD Ell] Is the tone of the letter formal? 124 UNIT ‘IO ...
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unit 10 - SU 2 - * An interconnected world TOPIC PREVIEW [I...

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