review 4 - Writ of Certiorari A formal document issued from...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Writ of Certiorari A formal document issued from the Supreme Court to  a lower federal or state court that calls up a case.  Used to get a case to make it to the supreme court  faster Stare Decisis A latin phrase meaning “let the decision stand.” Most  cases reaching appellate courts are settled on this  principle. Means that the court is going to follow the  precedent and that’s when it is used. Amicus Curiae Legal briefs submitted by a “friend of the court” for  the purpose of raising additional points of view and  presenting information not contained in the briefs of  the formal parties. These briefs attempt to influence a  court’s decision. Majority Opinion The opinion joined by a majority of the court  (generally known simply as `the opinion'). It is used  when stating how the court decided and why.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Dissenting Opinion A written opinion by a judge or justice who disagrees  with the appellate court's decision in a case. He  writes to try and convince the others to see things his  way and many times these have turned into the  majority opinion Concurring Opinion An opinion which follows the outcome of the majority  of the court, but might arrive there in a differing  manner. Used to make a statement by a judge who  does not want to seem like he just agrees. Writ of Mandamus A court order forcing action. In the dispute leading to  Marbury v. Madison, Marbury and his associates  asked the Supreme Court to issue a write ordering  Madison to give them their commissions. Ex Post Facto Laws An ex post facto law (from the Latin for "from after  the action") or retroactive law is a law that  retroactively changes the legal consequences (or status)  of actions committed or relationships that existed  prior to the enactment of the law.
Background image of page 2
Precedent How similar cases have been decided in the past. Used  as a sort of standard that if another case pops up  with this the precedent will most likely be looked at. What are the major differences between district  courts and appeals courts? Courts of appeals are courts empowered to review all final decisions of district  courts. They have the authority to review and enforce orders of many federal  regulatory agencies like the Securities and Exchange Commission. They focus on  correcting errors of procedure and law that occurred in the original proceedings of  legal cases, like when a district court judge gives improper instructions to a jury.  They are appellate courts and hold no trials and testimonies. There are 91 federal  courts of original jurisdiction (district courts). At least one is in each state. These 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/05/2012 for the course ENGLISH 101 taught by Professor Mills during the Spring '11 term at CSU Pueblo.

Page1 / 19

review 4 - Writ of Certiorari A formal document issued from...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online