CAP LTER site - Fox 1 CAP LTER site Central Arizona-Phoenix...

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CAP LTER site Central Arizona-Phoenix Long-Term Ecological Research site Brian Fox Grand Canyon University BIO182L December 9, 2010 Fox 1
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Abstract The Central-Arizona Phoenix Long-Term Ecological Research (CAP LTER) site began in 1997. Researchers question how services provided by evolving urban ecosystems influence human output, how human responses change the ecosystem’s structure and role, and urban sustainability in an unstable setting. The site is located where the Gila and Salt Rivers converge. CAP LTER scientists believe NPP in the central Arizona ecosystem is related, and it may be regulated by humans. Fox 2
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Central Arizona-Phoenix Long-Term Ecological Research site Introduction Between 1990 and 1996, Maricopa has had the most immigration than any other county in the US. Land development is rated at over 1 acre per hour (Martin, Stabler, Celestian, & Stutz, 2002). Out of 26 sites, The Central Arizona-Phoenix Long-Term Ecological Research (CAP LTER) site is given funds by the National Science Foundation. Put forth in 1997 with the Baltimore Ecosystem Study as the first of the urban LTER sites, the CAP LTER has fundamentally established urban ecology to be of importance to ecological inquiry. Research Research at this site is geared towards: How services provided by evolving urban ecosystems influence human output, how human responses change the ecosystem’s structure and role, and urban sustainability in an unstable setting ( Description , n.d.). How does urbanization change the structure and function of ecosystems and thereby alter the services provided by those ecosystems? How do people perceive and respond to ecosystem services, how are the services’ effects distributed spatially and with reference to characteristics of the population, and how do individual and collective behaviors further change ecosystem structure and function? How does the larger context of biophysical drivers (e.g., climate change) and societal drivers (e.g., immigration or regional urbanization) influence the interaction and feedbacks between ecosystems and society as mediated Fox 3
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through ecosystem services, and thereby influence the future of the urban ecosystem? ( Description , n.d.) CAP LTER’s structure is dynamic in the geographical and socioeconomic model. The dynamics of land usage and land cover and legacies are key focal points for research. More areas of importance are the changes related to the desert ecosystem through housing and urban infrastructure, urban landscaping, and alterations to the hydrologic system ( Description , n.d.). History
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This note was uploaded on 02/05/2012 for the course HLT, BIO 100, 182 taught by Professor A during the Fall '10 term at Grand Canyon.

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CAP LTER site - Fox 1 CAP LTER site Central Arizona-Phoenix...

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