Lecture_2 - Fall 2012 PHYS 218: General Physics Lecture 2:...

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Unformatted text preview: Fall 2012 PHYS 218: General Physics Lecture 2: Chapter 2.1, 2.2, 2.3 Mo4on, Forces and Newtons Laws Prof. Kol4ck Physics Rm. 11 MW 9:3010:20 Aristotle ` s Mechanics Motions Types of motion identified by Aristotle Celestial motion The motion of things like the planets, the Moon, and the stars Terrestrial motion The motion of everyday objects Motions of celestial objects and terrestrial objects look very different Mainly because terrestrial objects seem to come to a stop and celestial objects do not The natural state of terrestrial objects was at rest Sec4on 2.1 More About Aristotle ` s Terrestrial Motion Motion is caused by forces Terrestrial objects move only when acted upon by another object In modern terminology, this would say that an object moves only when acted on by a force Forces are produced by contact with other objects Sec4on 2.1 More About Forces A force is a push or a pull on an object Force is a vector quantity The magnitude of the force is the strength of the push or pull The direction of the force is the direction of the push or pull Denoted by F _ Sec4on 2.1 Motion...
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This note was uploaded on 02/05/2012 for the course PHYS 218 taught by Professor A during the Spring '08 term at Purdue University-West Lafayette.

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Lecture_2 - Fall 2012 PHYS 218: General Physics Lecture 2:...

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