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Lecture1 - Introduction Administration Readings Long-Term...

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Introduction Administration Readings Long-Term Growth Colonization Welcome to Econ 113! American Economic History University of California, Berkeley Department of Economics August 26, 2010 Econ 113 (UC Berkeley) Lecture 1 8/26/2010 0 / 38
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Introduction Administration Readings Long-Term Growth Colonization Course Organization Instructors: Jeffrey Greenbaum and Shari Eli Course Meetings: Tuesday and Thursday, 3:30-5:00 Office Hours: Thursday, 5:00-6:30, 520 Evans E-mail: [email protected] Econ 113 (UC Berkeley) Lecture 1 8/26/2010 1 / 38
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Introduction Administration Readings Long-Term Growth Colonization Today’s Agenda 1. What is economic history? 2. Administrative details 3. How to read an economics research paper 4. Long-term cross-country growth 5. Colonizing Americas Econ 113 (UC Berkeley) Lecture 1 8/26/2010 2 / 38
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Introduction Administration Readings Long-Term Growth Colonization What is economic history? The study of how the economy has developed from the past through today How did we get to where we are today and where are we going What do economic historians do? Use theory to show the mechanism by which the economy has evolved Mechanism: the explanation for how and why the economy developed Validate the mechanism with quantitative and narrative evidence Quantitative: data and statistics Narrative: qualitative evidence from primary sources Econ 113 (UC Berkeley) Lecture 1 8/26/2010 3 / 38
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Introduction Administration Readings Long-Term Growth Colonization Examples of economic history 1. Long-term growth: In 1700, income per resident was lower in the U.S. than other New World (American) colonies, such as Barbados and Cuba. How did the U.S. pull ahead and become a world economic leader? 2. Public policy: Child labor still plagues the developing world, but virtually ceased to exist in the U.S. about a century ago. Why did U.S. households start to send their children to school regularly? Are there any lessons that can be learned for international policy making? 3. Reinterpreting historical events: Slavey had been viewed as unprofitable Why did Southerners engage in this “unprofitable” institution? Econ 113 (UC Berkeley) Lecture 1 8/26/2010 4 / 38
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Introduction Administration Readings Long-Term Growth Colonization What questions will this course cover? Development of U.S. as most productive country throughout the 20th century Why did the U.S. overtake other countries as a world economic power? Natural advantages such as natural resources and geography Created advantages such as institutions and technological development What were the consequences of rapid American economic development? Pros: Mass schooling, Women’s Rights, and Civil Rights Movement Cons: Wage inequality, divorce, segregation, and discrimination Econ 113 (UC Berkeley) Lecture 1 8/26/2010 5 / 38
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Introduction Administration Readings Long-Term Growth Colonization What economics skills will be developed?
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