Education in Nigeria

Education in Nigeria - Alyssa Rubnitz Three Scholarly...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Alyssa Rubnitz Three Scholarly Papers in African Studies: Education in Nigeria November 20, 2010 Nigeria is a relatively populous and wealthy country in sub-Saharan Africa, yet it struggles with the ongoing issue of educational quality and equity. Cynthia Szymanski Sunal, Dennis W. Sunal, Ruqayyatu Rufai, Ahmed Inuwa, and Mary E. Haas, in their article “Perceptions of Unequal Access to Primary and Secondary Education: Findings from Nigeria,” describe parents’ and teachers’ views on the unequal participation in primary and secondary schools. Similarly, Christiana E.E. Okojie, in her article “Gender and Education as Determinants of Household Poverty in Nigeria,” finds a connection between gender, education, and poverty. Lastly, Edlyne Anugwom in his article, “Cogs in the Wheel: Academic Trade Unionism, Government, and the Crisis in Tertiary Education in Nigeria,” focuses on how education at the university level by discussion how unions and policy-makers react to current issues. All three articles describe different yet connecting reasons for educational challenges in Nigeria, and all search for a hopeful educational future. Cynthia Szymanski Sunal, Dennis W. Sunal, Ruqayyatu Rufai, Ahmed Inuwa, and Mary E. Haas. “Perceptions of Unequal Access to Primary and Secondary Education: Findings from Nigeria,” African Studies Review , Volume 46, Number 1 (April 2003), pp. 93-116. Sunal, Sunal, Rufai, Inuwa, and Haas identify the main issues targeting primary and secondary schools across Nigeria in recent years. They understand that there are many individuals throughout the country that are not enrolled, and they seek to understand who is not participating and why by interviewing parents and teachers. The authors identify several problems affecting the quality of primary and secondary schools that decrease enrollment (p. 96). Such factors affect certain groups of Nigerians, causing a number of families to decide against sending their children to school. After interviewing the participants, the authors identify several solutions to improve school and increase enrollment levels (p. 107).
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The authors collected data through interviews of 80 parents and 40 teachers throughout Nigeria. In order to find a representative group of participants, the authors targeted different states and various ethnic groups (p. 98). Of the parents involved in the study, half included families that did not enroll all or any of their children in primary or secondary school. In
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/07/2012 for the course ETHNIC 277 taught by Professor Hutchinson during the Fall '08 term at Wisconsin.

Page1 / 5

Education in Nigeria - Alyssa Rubnitz Three Scholarly...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online