Biomechanics_course_gw_07 stress concenpt

Biomechanics_course_gw_07 stress concenpt - Biosolid...

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Biosolid Mechanics Chapter 2 Stress, strain and constitutive relation
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Introduction Influencing parameters for the failure of the structures External load: Weight W Geometry: cross section area Material Failure An inability to perform the intended mechanical function Break Fracture Tearing Rupture Deformation excessively Permanent Non-permanent Figure 2.1
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Concept of stress Hooke’s spring experiment: use different metallic springs Force-Extension curve: one-to-one relationship F = k (x-x 0 ) k spring constant or stiffness Hooke original experiment did not consider the geometry Geometry: the thicker, the stiffer New parameter is needed to include cross area Intuition: F/A The force intensity: normal stress However, force effect is different when it act in different direction to a body’s surface Stress according to Cauchy: Force acting over an oriented area Depends on the vector of the force and surface Figure 2.3 Figure 2.2
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This note was uploaded on 02/08/2012 for the course BMEN 260 taught by Professor Mr.wang during the Spring '12 term at South Carolina.

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Biomechanics_course_gw_07 stress concenpt - Biosolid...

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