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Humans as a Species lecture

Humans as a Species lecture - Lecture 11 Humans as a...

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Student Choice Day Topic BIOL 1104, Spring 2011 Dr. Paula Lemons Special Thanks to Alex Rothbaum and Ben Bradshaw for consulting and background reading for this lecture. Lecture 11: Humans as a Species
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Learning Objectives 2 See an example of a multi-scientist, multi-year scientific study. Read and interpret the primate phylogeny to determine who the closest and most distant primate ancestors to humans are. Name the 5 key steps in primate evolution and provide examples of these steps (e.g., explain the role of the foramen magnum and explain the graph showing the relatively large human brain weight given body size). Explain where Ardi fits into the lineage of human evolution and the evidence to support this (e.g., dating of the fossils, skull shape, foramen magnum, pelvis, foot, and hands). Site examples of modern human evolution by natural selection. Describe how the Framingham Heart Study was used to show that humans are still evolving and the results and predictions from this study.
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A Case Study Written by Clyde F. Herreid, SUNY Buffalo Human Evolution
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At the time that Darwin wrote the Origin of Species, he had only one sentence about the topic merely saying, “Light will be thrown on the origin of man and his history”. In 1859, there was not a single “human” fossil known and everything was speculation. Today, we have thousands of hominid fossils and thousands of books and papers on the subject. Still we do not have enough. This is the story of one fossil find . . . 4
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Let’s see how scientists actually completed their work on one human-like fossil . . . 5
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December 17, 1992 When graduate student Gen Suwa saw a glint among the pebbles in the desert of Ethiopia, he knew immediately it was a “human” molar. 6
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Suwa called the team and on hands and knees they scoured the rocks looking for bone fragments. There, near the village of Aramis, they knew they had found something special, a new hominin—a once in a lifetime discovery.
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