Lecture06 - Lecture 6 February 3, 2012 Properties of Stars...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Lecture 6 February 3, 2012 Properties of Stars
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
News Undergraduate-level talks by astronomy faculty organized by Rutgers Astronomical Society Thursday nights, ~8:00 PM – 9:15 PM Next talk: Professor Chuck Keeton, “Black Holes and the Fifth Dimension” Second homework due Friday, February 10 Will be available on class website late tonight or sometime Saturday.
Background image of page 2
Properties of Stars Position on sky Right ascension & declination Distance Rate of change of position: “proper motion” Determined by relative velocity and distance. Rate of change of distance: radial velocity Determined by Doppler shift.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Stellar Properties Brightness: flux = energy/area/time passing through a plane perpendicular to the direction to the star. Electromagnetic and neutrino. Integrated over broad wavelength ranges: magnitude system at visible wavelengths f( λ ) = f λ or f( ν ) = f ν : spectrum df/dt: due to pulsation, rotation of spots, evolution of star…
Background image of page 4
Stellar Properties Mass: measure gravitational acceleration Orbits of binary stars. Stellar winds can slowly change mass. Radius: angular diameter & distance Eclipses in binary systems are the source of most measurements. Composition: analysis of spectrum yields that of the surface layers Temperature: surface T deduced from spectra Magnetic fields
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Coordinate systems: Earth's point of view Celestial coordinates: declination ranges from 90º (north celestial pole)
Background image of page 6
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/06/2012 for the course PHYSICS 441/541 taught by Professor Pryor during the Spring '12 term at Rutgers.

Page1 / 17

Lecture06 - Lecture 6 February 3, 2012 Properties of Stars...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 7. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online