Lecture 1 - E O Wilson 2002 The totality of life known as...

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E. O. Wilson, 2002 The totality of life, known as the biosphere to scientists and creation to theologians, is a membrane of organisms wrapped around Earth so thin it cannot be seen edgewise from a space shuttle, yet so internally complex that most species composing it remain undiscovered.
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Welcome to Lecture 3, Introductory Biology 152 Spring 2012 Lecturers: Dr. Robert Bohanan Ecology Prof. David Abbott Animal Physiology Prof. Donna Fernandez Plant Physiology Course coordinator: Jean Heitz Textbook: Biology 9th edition
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What Big Ideas or Concepts Are Central to Life? To be alive, and to continue to survive in changing environments, organisms must be able to: A. Keep their integrity separate from that of the environment and of other organisms, i.e. they must maintain homeostasis. As a result, life: 1. is cellular 2. must be able to control movement of substances into and out of the cell and as a result, must deal with the properties of diffusion and osmosis, flow rates and SA/V ratios. B. Transfer energy: 1. within cells 2. between cells between the environment and itself (e.g. from sun or from other organic compounds or organisms) C. Transfer information: 1. within cells 2. between cells (to maintain homeostasis or the conditions required for life to exist) 3. between organisms (to survive or to be able to reproduce effectively) 4. from one generation to the next (to provide for continuation of the species over time) D. Evolve. Environmental conditions determine which organisms will survive. Over time, environmental conditions can change. As a result, if species are to survive, they must include variants that can survive in the changed conditions. Variation within species is the result of genetic changes/mutations. Organisms do not evolve; populations evolve. ome key principles/concepts that recur through the above include the following. SA/V ratios, osmosis/diffusion rates and the properties of membranes affect the flow of substances into and out of cells and organisms. Energy obtained from the environment must be converted into forms that can be used by living cells/organisms. Interactions of organisms with the chemical and physical forces in their environment and with other organisms affect their evolution. .g.
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This note was uploaded on 02/07/2012 for the course BIO 152 taught by Professor Doyle during the Fall '08 term at University of Wisconsin.

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Lecture 1 - E O Wilson 2002 The totality of life known as...

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