Class7_Child_Labor - Working hard or hardly working?...

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Unformatted text preview: Working hard or hardly working? Sweatshops, child labor and comparative advantage Looking Referenced Outline: Labor standards, Sweatshops and Trade 1. What are labor standards? 2. Why do sweatshops exist? What causes poverty more generally? 3. What role is played by multinational firms / trade? Are they exploiting workers? Can they exploit workers? 4. Wages and worker safety: are they the same issue? 5. Is child labor different? 6. Does globalization alleviate or worsen poverty? Labor Standards 1. No forced labor 2. The right to organize and bargain collectively. 3. Equality Non-discrimination Equal pay for equal work 4. Abolition of child labor (especially the worst forms: slavery, prostitution) 5. Minimums minimum wage, minimum safety conditions All of these labor standards are part of US labor law in the domestic US market. However, the US has not agreed to international conventions that try to impose these standards globally. Only abolition of forced labor and abolition of worst kinds of child labor. Why wont the US agree to international rules if similar rules are enforced at home? Belief that identical rules are not appropriate for all countries. What are sweatshops? The United States Department of Labor defines a sweatshop as, any factory that violates two or more labor laws, such as those pertaining to wages and benefits, working hours, and child labor. http://businesstm.com/online-business-blog/sweatshops-child-labor-information.html Paul Krugman, Nicholas Kristof, and Johan Norberg each argue that sweatshops provide jobs with much higher wages and better conditions than compared to previously worked jobs by some individuals. To support their argument, they lean on the evidence of sweatshops closing in the past and individuals starving to death or turning to prostitution. They further claim that these sweatshops are the initial step to taking the country industrial and breaking into a better economy. However, most economists disagree with this viewpoint. What is the connection between globalization and poverty?What is the connection between globalization and poverty?...
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This note was uploaded on 02/06/2012 for the course ECON 370 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Purdue University-West Lafayette.

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Class7_Child_Labor - Working hard or hardly working?...

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