Instrument Mixes for Environmental Policy

Instrument Mixes for Environmental Policy - ISBN-01780-1...

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ISBN 978-92-64-01780-1 Instrument Mixes for Environmental Policy © OECD 2007 19 Chapter 1 Introduction and Basic Concepts This chapter introduces the main objectives of this report. The report, based on a series of in-depth case studies, examines the impacts on environmental effectiveness and economic efficiency of using an “instrument mix”, rather than a single instrument, to address a given environmental problem. The case studies review instrument mixes applied in OECD member countries to address household waste, non-point sources of water pollution in agriculture, residential energy efficiency, regional air pollution and emissions to air of mercury. The report examines how member countries assess the environmental effectiveness and economic efficiency of a given instrument or instrument mix. It analyses the additional impacts on environmental effectiveness and economic efficiency caused by the combination of instruments, and asks which types of instrument mixes are likely to provide the best results.
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1. INTRODUCTION AND BASIC CONCEPTS INSTRUMENT MIXES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY – ISBN 978-92-64-01780-1 – © OECD 2007 20 1.1. Background In 2003, the OECD Working Party on National Environmental Policy (WPNEP) launched a project to examine the environmental effectiveness and economic efficiency of “mixes of instruments” used in environmental policy. WPNEP has long been interested in these questions at the level of individual policy instruments; this project looked at essentially the same questions from the perspective of combinations of instruments. The main objectives of the project have been to derive further insights – and, where appropriate, elaborate policy recommendations – on: How should member countries assess the environmental effectiveness and economic efficiency of a given instrument mix? What are the additional impacts (in terms of environmental effectiveness and economic efficiency) that appear because a given instrument is used in combination with one or more other instruments?; and Which types of instrument mixes are likely to provide high environmental effectiveness and economic efficiency? To support the work, detailed case studies were carried out in five areas of environmental policy: municipal solid waste management, with an emphasis on household waste; non-point sources of water pollution, with an emphasis on nitrogen and phosphorous run-off and pesticide use in agriculture; regional air pollution, with an emphasis on contributors to acidification (sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides); residential energy efficiency, with an emphasis on dwellings and on household appliances; and emissions to air of mercury. After a discussion of some background concepts in this chapter, the report presents an overview of the specific instrument mixes currently in use in the five environmental policy areas that were examined in the case studies (Chapters 2-6). This is followed by an analysis
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This note was uploaded on 02/06/2012 for the course POL 223 taught by Professor Aldrich during the Fall '10 term at Purdue.

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Instrument Mixes for Environmental Policy - ISBN-01780-1...

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